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I have an object that encapsulate a network profile that have some characteristics. For example, my profile has a Connection and depending on it, it could or couldn't have an IP option (static or dhcp).

So, my first attempt was using a normal class that extends from dict and add some helper functions:

class Profile(dict):
    IP_CONNECTIONS = ('ethernet', 'wireless', 'pppoe')
    def is_ethernet(self): return self['Connection'] == 'ethernet'
    def is_wireless(self): return self['Connection'] == 'wireless'
    def is_wireless_adhoc(self): return self.is_wireless() and 'AdHoc' in self
    def has_ip(self)
        return self['Connection'] in self.IP_CONNECTIONS
    def has_ip_static(self)
        if not self.has_ip():
            return False
        if self.is_ipv4():
            return self['IP'] == 'static'
        if self.is_ipv6():
            return self['IP6'] == 'static'
        return False
    def has_ip_dhcp(self):
        if not self.has_ip():
            return False
        if self.is_ipv4():
            return self['IP'] == 'dhcp'
        if self.is_ipv6():
            return self['IP6'] == 'dhcp' or self['IP6'] == 'dhcp-noaddr'
        return False
    def is_ipv4(self): return self.has_ip() and 'IP' in self
    def is_ipv6(self): return self.has_ip() and 'IP6' in self
    def get_client(self):
        if self.has_ip_dhcp() and 'DHCPClient' in self:
            return self['DHCPClient']
        return None

This worked, but I had a enormous class with a lot of is_* and has_* characteristic functions. Most of them would be only used for a very specific profile, and return False most of the time.

Then it crossed my mind that I can use inheritance to describe characteristics.

After trying and failed to implement a metaclass because the data was not yet available when the __new__ method was called. I came up with something like this:

def load_profile(filename):
    data = _read_profile(filename)
    bases = _classify_profile(data)
    baseclass = type('Profile', bases, {})
    return baseclass(data)

class IP:
    CONNECTIONS = ('ethernet', 'wireless')
class IPv4(IP):
    def is_static(self):
        return self['IP'] == 'static'
class IPv6(IP):
    def is_static(self):
        return self['IP6'] == 'static'
class DHCP:
    def get_client(self):
        return self['DHCPClient'] if 'DHCPClient' in self else None

class Wireless:
    def is_adhoc(self):
        return 'AdHoc' in self

def _classify_profile(data):
    classes = [dict]

    if data['Connection'] == 'wireless':
        classes.append(Wireless)
    if data['Connection'] in IP.CONNECTIONS:
        if 'IP' in data:
            classes.append(IPv4)
            if data['IP'] == 'dhcp':
                classes.append(DHCP)
        if 'IP6' in data:
            classes.append(IPv6)
            if data['IP6'] == 'dhcp' or data['IP6'] == 'dhcp-noaddr':
                classes.append(DHCP)

    return tuple(classes)

When before I was doing profile.has_ip(), now I just test it with isinstance(profile, IP). This seems to me more clear with good separation of responsibility.

Question: Is this a good way of implementing dynamic inheritance? What would be the pythonic way of doing this?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
I like this video about Design very much: vimeo.com/26330100 –  User Oct 8 '13 at 18:48
    
@User Very interesting. Thanks! –  guide42 Oct 8 '13 at 20:34

1 Answer 1

I do not really know what you mean by dynamic inheritance but I would write it this way:

base_classes = []

class IP(dict):
    CONNECTIONS = ('ethernet', 'wireless')
    def is_static(self):
        raise NotImplementedError('To be implemented in subclasses.') 
    @classmethod
    def wants_the_meaningful_named_data(cls, data):
        return False
base_classes.append(IP)

class IPv4(IP):
    def is_static(self):
        return self['IP'] == 'static'
    @classmethod
    def wants_the_meaningful_named_data(cls, data):
        return data['Connection'] in cls.CONNECTIONS and 'IP' in data
base_classes.append(IPv4)

class IPv6(IP):
    def is_static(self):
        return self['IP6'] == 'static'
    @classmethod
    def wants_the_meaningful_named_data(cls, data):
        return data['Connection'] in cls.CONNECTIONS and 'IP6' in data
base_classes.append(IPv6)

def load_profile(filename):
    data = _read_profile(filename)
    for base_class in base_classes:
        if base_class.wants_the_meaningful_named_data(data):
            return base_class(data)
    return dict(data)

Something like this would be what I like. I do not see the need to go into metaclasses.

share|improve this answer
    
The IP classes were only an example. The profile has a lot more characteristics that need to be implemented at the same time. There is one big class for each 'Connection' value, so I can do isinstance(profile, Wireless) and profile.is_adhoc(). Another example is if 'IP' is 'dhcp' or 'IP6' is 'dhcp' or 'dhcp-noaddr', I extend from a DHCP class that has profile.get_client. –  guide42 Oct 8 '13 at 19:15
    
You can. I would like profile.is_wireless() and profile.is_adhoc() better. –  User Oct 8 '13 at 19:18

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