Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

As programmers, we've all put together a really cool program or pieced together some hardware in an interesting way to solve a problem. Today I was thinking about those hacks and how some of them are deprecated by modern technology (for example, you no longer need to hack your Tivo to add a network port). In the software world, we take things like drag-and-drop on a web page for granted now, but not too long ago that was a pretty exciting hack as well.

One of the neatest hardware hacks I've seen was done by a former coworker at a telecom company years ago. He had a small portable television in his office and he would watch it all day long while working. To get away with it, he wired a switch to the on/off that was activated via his foot under his desk.

What's the coolest hardware or software hack you've personally seen or done? What hack are you working on right now?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by George Stocker, Michael Myers Nov 1 '11 at 14:47

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

43 Answers 43

The first time I had to try to understand and modify a piece of code written in a functional style. I spent an hour trying to understand where anything happened, then found that all of the work was done in a line that looked something like this:

for my $row (@data) {
  push @formatted, join ",", map $format[$_]->($data->[$_]), 0..$#$data;
}

I tracked down the author and exclaimed, "Why didn't you comment that???" His response was, "What comment would have helped?" I tried to think of one, and failed.

That code taught me a technique that I have found very useful to this day. However I have learned that it is a technique that should be used often or never, but nowhere in between. Because, really, no comment will help. Either you understand that there is a line there, what it does, and that you don't need to worry about it, or else you won't understand that code.

The same programmer routinely did other impressive things. For example at a previous job he had modified the C library so that when a C program dumped core it didn't just dump core. Instead it would create a coredump, then send an email to the development team with a stack backtrace and the coredump attached. This allowed them to notice and fix bugs in cron jobs that had problems.

share|improve this answer

Casting a string with .ToString() is always a WTF I find.

share|improve this answer

It's an oldie, but for me it was Duff's device:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duff's_device

(for some reason I can't get markdown to show that URL as a link)


strcpy(to, from, count)
char *to, *from;
int count;
{
    int n = (count + 7) / 8;
    switch (count % 8) {
    case 0: do { *to = *from++;
    case 7:      *to = *from++;
    case 6:      *to = *from++;
    case 5:      *to = *from++;
    case 4:      *to = *from++;
    case 3:      *to = *from++;
    case 2:      *to = *from++;
    case 1:      *to = *from++;
               } while (--n > 0);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Back in high-school I was really proud of writing a 3d graphing program on my ti-83 because my parents wouldn't buy me an 89.

share|improve this answer

When looking at how to use TCP in 4D, I came across this variation of the Duff Device in the documentation:

$SentOK:=False  //A flag to indicate if we made it through all of the calls
Case of 
   : (SMTP_New ($smtp_id)!=0)
   : (SMTP_Host ($smtp_id;<>pref_Server)!=0)
   : (SMTP_From ($smtp_id;vFrom)!=0)
   : (SMTP_To ($smtp_id;vTo)!=0)
   : (SMTP_Subject ($smtp_id;vSubject)!=0)
   : (SMTP_Body ($smtp_id;vMessage)!=0)
   : (SMTP_Send ($smtp_id)!=0)
Else 
   $SentOK:=True  //message was composed and mailed successfully
End case 
If ($smtp_id!=0)  //If a Message Envelope was created we should clear it now
   $OK:=SMTP_Clear ($smtp_id)
End if

I looked at it and thought it was really clever (I still do). Unfortunately, it wasn't what I needed and I never got the chance to use it.

share|improve this answer

Making a scanner out of a printer head. Modern versions include Canon's, but this trick is actually really old.

share|improve this answer

David Carlisle's TeX poem:

\let~\catcode~`76~`A13~`F1~`j00~`P2jdefA71F~`7113jdefPALLF
PA''FwPA;;FPAZZFLaLPA//71F71iPAHHFLPAzzFenPASSFthP;A$$FevP
A@@FfPARR717273F737271P;ADDFRgniPAWW71FPATTFvePA**FstRsamP
AGGFRruoPAqq71.72.F717271PAYY7172F727171PA??Fi*LmPA&&71jfi
Fjfi71PAVVFjbigskipRPWGAUU71727374 75,76Fjpar71727375Djifx
:76jelse&U76jfiPLAKK7172F71l7271PAXX71FVLnOSeL71SLRyadR@oL
RrhC?yLRurtKFeLPFovPgaTLtReRomL;PABB71 72,73:Fjif.73.jelse
B73:jfiXF71PU71 72,73:PWs;AMM71F71diPAJJFRdriPAQQFRsreLPAI
I71Fo71dPA!!FRgiePBt'el@ lTLqdrYmu.Q.,Ke;vz vzLqpip.Q.,tz;
;Lql.IrsZ.eap,qn.i. i.eLlMaesLdRcna,;!;h htLqm.MRasZ.ilk,%
s$;z zLqs'.ansZ.Ymi,/sx ;LYegseZRyal,@i;@ TLRlogdLrDsW,@;G
LcYlaDLbJsW,SWXJW ree @rzchLhzsW,;WERcesInW qt.'oL.Rtrul;e
doTsW,Wk;Rri@stW aHAHHFndZPqpa.rtMRrgeLinZ.irLtYer.W,:jbye

run pdftex on this file and be amazed.

share|improve this answer

There is the switch nested inside loop for loop unwinding known as the Duff device

dsend(to, from, count)
char *to, *from;
int count;
{
    int n = (count + 7) / 8;
    switch (count % 8) {
    case 0: do { *to = *from++;
    case 7:      *to = *from++;
    case 6:      *to = *from++;
    case 5:      *to = *from++;
    case 4:      *to = *from++;
    case 3:      *to = *from++;
    case 2:      *to = *from++;
    case 1:      *to = *from++;
               } while (--n > 0);
    }
}

Its not THAT powerful however it is a nice abuse of the C syntax

share|improve this answer

http://pida.co.uk/ A hack that would end the Vim/Emacs flame war! (!!11eleven)

share|improve this answer

A boot loader for a CPU that didn't support boot loaders.

The CPU is a derivitive of a member of a rockwell CPU family that runs the code it's given. The toolchain produces either RAM images ( which you can JTAG in and run for debugging) OR it producees ROM images.

There is a chaining bootloader. But it only chains. You've got to be running, and it only works for RAM.

Just in case I felt creative, The CPU has no JMP instruction. (I'm not kidding.) No RST instruction either.

So we needed to load a program from a file system and run it, and this CPU is very definitely embedded and doesn't want to do that.

The filesystem sat in Flash ROM and would only operate at the address it was written at. (It's not relocatable)

So I loaded the ROM with a boot loader that would boot load a boot loader into the bottom of RAM. The the CPU writes to a gate array, the that

1) asserts reset. 2) swaps the chip selects for RAM and ROM 3) releases the reset.

The CPU ends up running from RAM, ready to read code from the filesystem into RAM.

It actually works. I was "inspired" by the way the IBM PC-AT gets the 286 chip out of protected mode.

share|improve this answer

Simple one. One of my early mentors went off on summer vacation with his family. When he returned he immediatelly sat at the terminal and typed in a GMAP routine, compiled (clean) and pushed it out. I asked if I could help testing and he said it's ok he'd "sand tested" it. Huh? Apparently he was bored on the beach, so found a flat piece of sand, coded and checked it - "sand checked". Brilliant guy.

share|improve this answer

Years ago, I wrote a program to display text in big block letters, in order to put them in the header of my source files so I could print them multipage in very small font. I built a small table with the pixel information in a 5x5 square to print the characters. It only had capital letters and numbers. So pa would become...

####    #
#   #  # #
####  #   #
#     #####
#     #   #

some time later I found in the original IBM PC BIOS listing that came with the IBM PC Technigal Reference that it had a 8x8 character generator. So I found it and extracted it from a memory dump. So I was able to generate the complete character set, so I could use lowercase letters...

## ###   ####
 ##  ##     ##
 ##  ##  #####
 #####  ##  ##
 ##      ### ##
####
share|improve this answer

I once used push buttons in FoxPro (windows) to generate bar chart in the very first program I wrote. That was really cool for me.

share|improve this answer

protected by Evan Mulawski Jun 23 '12 at 22:21

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.