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I can't debug my code in Intellij IDEA. When debug mode is active and running, but the breakpoints don't have that "v" checked that represents a valid and stoppable breakpoint.

See the image: http://prntscr.com/1w0owu.

I really search on the web for an answer. What I suppose to do?

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Did it ever work? I've had situations where intellij and grails got out of sync so debugging stopped working because intellij didn't "realize" that code. A 'grails clean' fixes this pretty quickly. What version of Intellij and Grails? –  Gregg Oct 8 '13 at 16:22
    
I'm using the latest version. Grails 2.3.0 and Intellij 12.1.5. The Clean command doesn't work too. I realized that project folder inside .grails/2.3.0/projects wasn't created. –  ricardogobbo Oct 8 '13 at 16:51

8 Answers 8

up vote 63 down vote accepted

I have tried all mentioned here without success. The only helpful information is here.

In essence you should disable forked execution by adding the following to grails-app/conf/BuildConfig.groovy:

grails.project.fork = [
    test: false,
    run: false
]

Now debugging is available in IntelliJ IDEA Ultimate Edition v.12.1.6 just by ordinary Debug without Remote debugging. Tested on Grails 2.3.1, Java 1.7.0_45, Windows 7 64-bit.

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2  
Tested on Grails 2.3.4 and IntelliJ 13 as well +1. Working. –  meoww- Dec 8 '13 at 15:05
2  
Tested on Grails 2.3.8 and IntelliJ 13.1.3 as well +1 Working. –  RATS May 30 '14 at 6:33
3  
Tested on Grails 2.4.0 and IntelliJ 13.1.3 - all working! I personally just commented the run and test lines that were in the aforementioned config map. –  atc Jun 22 '14 at 12:03
1  
Tested on Grails 2.4.2 and IntelliJ 13.1.3 - works by simply commenting out the runt / test lines as @atc mentioned. –  Scott Bennett-McLeish Jul 13 '14 at 8:19
1  
Tested on Grails 2.4.4 and IntelliJ 14.0.3 - works fine. –  codehead Feb 4 at 16:32

Try this:

In idea choose Edit configurations from list next to 'run' button. Then add Remote, choose your name and left default remote configuration settings. (port 5005 etc)

Run your app from console by using

grails run-app --debug-fork

In idea, choose your configuration from list and hit debug button when console display info:

Listening for transport dt_socket at address: 5005
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Since Grails 2.3, forked execution for several Grails commands (e.g. run-app, run-test) was introduced. If you just debug a Grails application from IntelliJ IDEA, the GrailsStarter process will be started with debug options on. The output on the IDEA console will be:

/usr/lib/jvm/default-java/bin/java -agentlib:jdwp=transport=dt_socket,address=127.0.0.1:59935,suspend=y,server=n [...] /opt/idea-IU-133.330/lib/idea_rt.jar org.codehaus.groovy.grails.cli.support.GrailsStarter [...] run-app Connected to the target VM, address: '127.0.0.1:59935', transport: 'socket'

The application itself will be started in a separate process named ForkedTomcatServer. This is where your code runs and where your debugger should actually connect to.

To accomplish that, set debug: true in BuildConfig.groovy at the run configuration of grails.project.fork. Just run Grails now from IDEA (do not debug) and you will see the following line in the console when the application is ready to serve HTTP requests:

Listening for transport dt_socket at address: 5005

This is where you want to direct a separate remote run configuration to. As soon as your remote debugger connected, issue a HTTP request and debugging will work.

You can also disable forked execution for compile/test/run/war/console Grails commands entirely by setting the value associated with the command entry in grails.project.fork to false. But then you will lose the benefits for forked execution added in Grails 2.3.

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1  
Thank you, this got me in the right track. Ted Naleid provides a nice summary and details the pros and cons of disabling forked execution for debugging, with two useful alternatives: naleid.com/blog/2014/11/10/debugging-grails-forked-mode –  codehead Feb 4 at 16:29

Debugging a grails (2.3+) application can be done in two ways.

1. Simple solution: disable debug

edit BuildConfig.groovy:

grails.project.fork = [
    war: [maxMemory: 768, minMemory: 64, debug: false, maxPerm: 256, fork ...
    run: [maxMemory: 768, minMemory: 64, debug: false, maxPerm: 256, fork ...

to

grails.project.fork = [
    war: [maxMemory: 768, minMemory: 64, debug: false, maxPerm: 256, fork ...
    run: false,

Pros:

  • Simple to do (and get on with your development)

Cons:

  • This removes the ability to perform runtime code replacement. This means that if you change code, it will no longer be picked up automatically and you will need to restart the application to see the changes. This can be very time consuming.

2. Involved solution: debug forked runtime

This is a somewhat more complex solution where you attach a debugger to a running grails application. It is described in more detail in this blog post.

After setup you have an extra run configuration that allows you to start up grails in forked mode, and yet another extra run configuration that allows you to debug that forked mode. The catch is that you are required to start both or it does not work.

Pros:

  • You have both debugging and runtime code replacement
  • This does not interfere with starting the application in normal mode. (i.e. you have extra options)

Cons:

  • Setting up takes a little bit of time
  • Starting up in debug mode requires is a more complex two step process (i.e. it takes longer)

Considerations

Solution 2 is mostly superior in the sense that it allows flexibility. I personally don't use debug a lot, so just start in normal mode. When I want to debug, I restart in debug mode.

Solution 1 is strictly better if you need to debug and also need to restart a lot. For instance when you are working on your domain classes or database setup in your BootStrap.groovy.

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Did you see this article? It details the how to step by step and got me past my problem.

http://mrhaki.blogspot.com/2013/12/grails-goodness-debugging-app-in-forked.html

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Way better. No need to run in non forked mode... –  Philippe Mar 20 at 15:47

Just three guesses:

Try running run-app, not run-war, both should work, but may be run-war just isn't working.

Or: try debugging remotely from console:

grails -debug run-app and then connect with Remote Debug in Idea.

Or, the last resort: downgrading your project to previous Grails versions could work. Yes, this is really annoying.

Hope this helps.

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it has to be -debug-fork otherwise you're right –  fabiangebert Jun 24 '14 at 11:40

I tested with intellij latest with Grails 2.3.4 on Mac Os x Lion.

Then I tried Igors's advice and it is working without forked mode.

grails.project.fork = [
    test: false,
    run: false
]

Please check for detail grails documentation

if you want to debug forked mode you should check following blog post explainsvery well.

http://blog.jdriven.com/2013/12/grails-goodness-debugging-app-forked-mode/

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This should not ever be the default configuration and only be left to the individual's choice. It's a freakin pain to do two configurations just get this thing running in debug mode in intellij. First you have to setup or modify the normal run configuration by adding "--debug-fork" after run-app. Second, you have to configure remote debugging , while accepting all the defaults. Then you have to run the run configuration, and when that's running, you run the debug configuration. What a pain. I prefer totally doing away with running without the forked option while developing. Time is money and I don't have time to monkey around. See Mr.HAKI explanation on doing this. http://blog.jdriven.com/2013/12/grails-goodness-debugging-app-forked-mode/

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I think the answer would be more useful if you first gave the answer, then your commentary on why it is annoying. Perhaps leaving off most of the commentary as well. –  verdammelt Feb 4 '14 at 1:41
    
No problem ... see my edited entry above: blog.jdriven.com/2013/12/… good luck. –  Beaumont Muni Feb 7 '14 at 14:43
    
Here is an update. I don't seem to be having this problem any more, but if it's not as important to you, I commented out portions of of the BuildConfig.groovy file under the conf directory that deals forking the JVM for optimizing memory when grails is running. //uncomment (and adjust settings) to fork the JVM to isolate //classpaths //grails.project.fork = [ // run: [maxMemory:1024, minMemory:64, debug:false, maxPerm:256] //] –  Beaumont Muni Aug 28 '14 at 19:43

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