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Why does Resharper warn me about "access to disposed closure" in the following code sample:

using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand())
{
    command.Parameters.Add("@temp", SqlDbType.VarChar);
    Action<string> action = str =>
        {
            command.Parameters["@temp"].Value = string.Empty;
        };
}

I don't use delegate outside using statement... How to fix this?

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1  
-1. Google "access to disposed closure" for thousands of results discussing this topic. –  DeeMac Oct 8 '13 at 12:56
    
@wudzik Add it as a answer, That's it :) –  Sriram Sakthivel Oct 8 '13 at 12:57
    
@wudzik Thanks. I doubted because I don't actually use action somewhere else. –  Qué Padre Oct 8 '13 at 12:59
    
@QuéPadre as I said in my answer, resharper is just warning you about that :) –  wudzik Oct 8 '13 at 13:00
2  
@QuéPadre - grow up. I'm not being 'mean'. You've demonstrated no understanding at all of what resharper means by this. Which indicates you've done little research. My comment was actually advice. Google probably has your answer, and then you'll know for the future too. –  DeeMac Oct 8 '13 at 13:05
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are referencing command in action, you can use action in somewhere else then in using and reference to disposed command.

Resharper is telling you that you can access to disposed closure, because using action outside using will cause that. Avoid using disposable object like that, of course it will throw NullReferenceException, but it can be difficult to find the real problem.

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Tell me if I'm wrong, but won't it throw an ObjectDisposedException and not a NRE? –  knittl Mar 26 at 14:44
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This code:

Action<string> action = str =>
{
    command.Parameters["@temp"].Value = string.Empty;
};

defines a delegate variable action that uses command. A delegate is a method definition that can be passed around as a variable and called somewhere else using action.Invoke(). Command is a disposable closure.

The reason Resharper flags this is because this code does not directly indicate at what point in time this delegate will actually be invoked. It is possible, in principle, that the definition of the delegate will be around (and will be invoked) after command has been disposed.

Resharper 8.1, the most recent version as of this writing, is not able to determine that this delegate cannot really be invoked from somewhere else.

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