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Given a simple function

function Test()

    global foo;
    foo = 4;

end

On execution the variable 'foo' is written to the base workspace. When the function ends, foo is then removed from the workspace. Is there a way, preferably without writing a *.mat file and re-loading that file to the workspace, to have the variable persist after the function terminates?

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1  
You should also make foo global in your workspace. –  r.m. Oct 8 '13 at 14:08
1  
just return that value if you do not want to have to deal with making things global –  MZimmerman6 Oct 8 '13 at 14:09
    
possible duplicate of Declaring a global variable in MATLAB –  Dan Oct 8 '13 at 14:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Global variables aren't a good idea. It makes your code difficult to maintain and debug. Rather return the varible:

function foo = Test()
    foo = 4;
end

and now in your main script call foo = Test(); and it will effectively persist.

If you really really want to use global variables (but you really really shouldn't) then

function Test()
    global foo;
    foo = 4;
end

and in your main script just first declare foo as global

global foo
Test()
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While I appreciate the quick and accurate response, Stack Overflow is about questions and answers, not opinions. Opinions would be best left as footnotes, perhaps a link to the ultimate written opinion someplace on the net. I do completely agree with your opinion. In the system I've adopted however that's how it is and a change would be a massive rearchitecture effort, which is why in this case the opinion isn't valuable. –  J Collins Oct 8 '13 at 14:27
    
@JCollins It's not an opinion, it is an answer. The answer to how do you get a variable to persist IS to return it. I have provided the syntax for using global variables should you have to as well for those unfortunate cases where you don't want to restructure legacy code. But also, even if it is an opinion, it is extremely valuable because many people in the future will be reading this and they might benefit from seeing a more robust method because for the majority of people, it isn't too late to change. –  Dan Oct 8 '13 at 14:39
    
Granted it is both and I appreciate the answer component enough to accept it. Just a pet peeve of mine when on forums people refuse to answer questions in preference of getting on their soap box. I'm only commenting on your first line, the rest is exactly what I needed thanks. –  J Collins Oct 8 '13 at 16:05

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