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For some protocol testing I need to randomize the case of each character in a lot of strings. The strings are commands, created by my application, which will be sent via a winsock control to a client.

As it involves a lot of strings I want each part to be as fast as possible.

Right now I have:

Private Function RandomCaps(strText As String) As String
  Dim lngChar As Long
  Dim strLower As String, strUpper As String
  Dim strRandom As String
  strRandom = ""
  strLower = LCase$(strText)
  strUpper = UCase$(strText)
  For lngChar = 1 To Len(strText)
    If Int(2 * Rnd) = 0 Then
      strRandom = strRandom & Mid$(strLower, lngChar, 1)
    Else
      strRandom = strRandom & Mid$(strUpper, lngChar, 1)
    End If
  Next lngChar
  RandomCaps = strRandom
End Function

This is pretty straightforward, but probably not the fastest way.

What could I do to improve its speed?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

To optimize code by RDHS, you don't really need to keep an uppercase version of the string. I think this is as optimized as you can get.

CODE 1:

Private Function RandomCaps(s As String) As String
    Dim i As Long
    RandomCaps = LCase$(s)
    For i = 1 To Len(s)
        If Rnd < 0.5 Then
            Mid(RandomCaps, i, 1) = UCase(Mid(RandomCaps, i, 1))
        End If
    Next i
End Function

The code above is good, however, in the case of really really large strings, you might wanna try this (not tested for performance vs RDHS's code):

CODE 2:

Private Function RandomCaps(s As String) As String
    Dim b() As Byte
    b = StrConv(Text1.Text, vbFromUnicode)
    Dim i As Long
    For i = 0 To UBound(b) - 1
        If Rnd < 0.5 Then
            If UCase(Chr(b(i))) = Chr(b(i)) Then
               'original char is uppercase, make it lowercase
                b(i) = Asc(LCase(Chr(b(i))))
            Else
                'original char is lowercase, make it uppercase
                b(i) = Asc(UCase(Chr(b(i))))
            End If
        End If
    Next i
    RandomCaps = StrConv(b, vbUnicode)
End Function

EDIT:

I did some performance testing and the difference between the two codes above is negligible: the 2nd code block is only about 1% faster then the first one.

EDIT 2:

Disregard my previous edit. Code 2 is approximately 50% less efficient as Code 1. however, as RDHS suggested, I adjusted code 2 to compare the values instead of going back and forth from CHR to ASC and it is more efficient starting with input strings that are approximately 40 characters long. The longer the input string, the better code 3 performance. With an input string that is 944640 characters long, Code 3 is 57% faster then Code 1.

Statistics: First column is the length of the input string (in chars) Second column is Code 3 efficiency compared to Code 2. As you can see, with string length of 5 chars, Code 2 is 46% more efficient. Starting with string length around 40, Code 3 becomes more and more efficient.

5 -46.80%

50 6.22%

100 21.50%

500 38.54%

1000 41.11%

10000 44.87%

100000 43.25%

1260000 43.02%

CODE 3:

Private Function RandomCaps(s As String) As String
    Dim b() As Byte
    b = StrConv(Text1.Text, vbFromUnicode)
    Dim i As Long
    For i = 0 To UBound(b) - 1
        If Rnd < 0.5 Then
            If b(i) >= 64 And b(i) <= 90 Then
                'A to Z
                b(i) = b(i) + 32
            ElseIf b(i) >= 97 And b(i) <= 122 Then
                'a to z
                b(i) = b(i) - 32
            Else
                'everything else
            End If
        End If
    Next i
    RandomCaps = StrConv(b, vbUnicode)
End Function
share|improve this answer
    
If you use the ASCII uppercase and lowercase ranges (65-90, 97-122) and convert case by adding/subtracting 32, your second code sample becomes much faster and outperforms my answer for strings larger than ~100 characters. – rdhs Oct 8 '13 at 17:54
    
Ill test with the the ASCII range shortly – George Oct 8 '13 at 19:07
    
Tests completed – George Oct 8 '13 at 20:06
    
thanks! thanks for the thorough testing as well! the strings will be from 4 to 255 characters long with most strings having a length of about 10 characters, so i will do some testing in my program as well and pick the fastest code :) – Hrqls Oct 15 '13 at 6:19

Instead of concatenating strings together, use Mid to change the string in-place:

Private Function RandomCaps(s As String) As String
    Dim uc As String
    Dim i As Long

    RandomCaps = LCase$(s)
    uc = UCase$(s)
    For i = 1 To Len(s) 
        If Rnd < 0.5 Then
            Mid(RandomCaps, i, 1) = Mid(uc, i, 1)
        End If
    Next i
End Function

You can try using MidB, but it hardly makes any difference – and since it works with individual bytes, you're in for some nasty surprises if you don't know how VB6 stores strings.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! i always forget that i can use mid$() on the lefthand side as well, that makes it a lot faster already :) – Hrqls Oct 15 '13 at 6:20

Use MidB() instead of Mid. MidB is a bit faster. The other solution could be to copy the stringpointer into an Array of integer. for example:

Public Type TUDTPtr
    pSA        As Long
    Reserved   As Long ' z.B. für vbVarType oder IRecordInfo
    cDims      As Integer
    fFeatures  As Integer
    cbElements As Long
    cLocks     As Long
    pvData     As Long
    cElements  As Long
    lLBound    As Long
End Type

Public Type TCharPointer
    pudt    As TUDTPtr
    Chars() As Integer
End Type

Public Enum SAFeature
    FADF_AUTO = &H1
    FADF_STATIC = &H2
    FADF_EMBEDDED = &H4

    FADF_FIXEDSIZE = &H10
    FADF_RECORD = &H20
    FADF_HAVEIID = &H40
    FADF_HAVEVARTYPE = &H80

    FADF_BSTR = &H100
    FADF_UNKNOWN = &H200
    FADF_DISPATCH = &H400
    FADF_VARIANT = &H800
    FADF_RESERVED = &HF008
End Enum

Public Declare Sub RtlMoveMemory Lib "kernel32" ( _
                   ByRef pDst As Any, _
                   ByRef pSrc As Any, _
                   ByVal bLength As Long)

Public Declare Sub RtlZeroMemory Lib "kernel32" ( _
                   ByRef pDst As Any, _
                   ByVal bLength As Long)

Public Declare Function ArrPtr Lib "msvbvm60" _
                        Alias "VarPtr" ( _
                        ByRef pArr() As Any) As Long

Public Sub New_UDTPtr(ByRef this As TUDTPtr, _
                      ByVal Feature As SAFeature, _
                      ByVal bytesPerElement As Long, _
                      Optional ByVal CountElements As Long = 1, _
                      Optional ByVal lLBound As Long = 0)
    With this
        .pSA = VarPtr(.cDims)
        .cDims = 1
        .cbElements = bytesPerElement
        .fFeatures = CInt(Feature)
        .cElements = CountElements
        .lLBound = lLBound
    End With
End Sub
Public Sub New_CharPointer(ByRef this As TCharPointer, ByRef StrVal As String)
    With this
        Call New_UDTPtr(.pudt, FADF_AUTO Or FADF_FIXEDSIZE, 2, Len(StrVal), 1)
        With .pudt
            .pvData = StrPtr(StrVal)
        End With
        Call RtlMoveMemory(ByVal ArrPtr(.Chars), ByVal VarPtr(.pudt), 4)
    End With
End Sub

Public Sub DeleteCharPointer(ByRef this As TCharPointer)
    With this
        Call RtlZeroMemory(ByVal ArrPtr(.Chars), 4)
    End With
End Sub

your function then could look like:

Private Sub RandomCapsX(strText As String) 'As String
    Dim i As Long
    Dim p As TCharPointer: Call MCharPointer.New_CharPointer(p, strText)
    For i = 1 To p.pudt.cElements
        Select Case p.Chars(i)
        Case 65 To 90
            'Uppercase
            p.Chars(i) = p.Chars(i) + Int(2 * Rnd) * 32
        Case 97 To 122
            'lowercase
            p.Chars(i) = p.Chars(i) - Int(2 * Rnd) * 32
        End Select
    Next
    Call MCharPointer.DeleteCharPointer(p)
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! for the time being i will be using the code from George's answer. but saving your code for later when i will do some finetuning and will try to maximize its speed. – Hrqls Oct 15 '13 at 6:21
    
maybe you don't need it, because it's only about 10-20% faster on my machine. but be sure to understand how it works. if you want to try it anyway, you must define the TCharpointer outside RandomCaps. – OlimilOops Oct 23 '13 at 6:31
    
thanks will play with it, also because i am curious to how it works :) – Hrqls Oct 24 '13 at 7:31
1  
don't forget to call DeleteCharPointer in the end, maybe in Form_Unload otherwise it may crash. The benefit with this technique is you have direct access to the unicode characters of VB (BSTR). (if you need to) – OlimilOops Oct 24 '13 at 14:54

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