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I'm used to used the following feature of bash :

for i in ${1..23} ; do echo $i ; done

This doesn't generalize. For instance, replacing 23 by even $p does not work. As the documentation says, this is a purely syntactic feature.

What would you replace this with ?

Note : Of course, this could be done using a while and an auxiliary variable, but this is not what i'm looking for, even if it works. I'm failing back to this actually.

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2  
do you know about the for ((i=1;i<=p;i++)) loop? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 17 '09 at 22:51
    
remove this, I didn't have the "full" comment (just for alone). No, I didn't know about this, thanks. Btw, you should had '$' in front of i and p. –  Gzorg Dec 17 '09 at 22:54
    
Dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/169511 –  ephemient Dec 17 '09 at 22:57
    
Slight difference : seq evaluates the boundary only once; while the arithmetic form evaluates it at each iteration. –  Gzorg Dec 17 '09 at 23:11
3  
@Gzorg, bash allows to omit $ in arithmetic expressions. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 17 '09 at 23:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use the seq tool to achieve the effect, I don't know if that's okay for your use case

~$ P=3 && for i in `seq 1 $P`; do echo $i; done
1
2
3

or litb's suggestion

~$ P=3 && for ((i=1;i<=$P;i++)); do echo $i; done
1
2
3
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I was looking for a bash centric feature, that's why litb is better for my "use case". seq is rather neat too. –  Gzorg Dec 17 '09 at 23:01

If you have it available, the seq command can do similar. Your example might then be:

p=23
for i in `seq 1 $p`
do
    echo $i
done
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On linux, there is a seq command (unfortunately it's missing in OS X).

#!/bin/bash
p=23
for i in `seq 1 $p`;
do
    echo $i
done

OS X workaround: http://scruss.com/blog/2008/02/08/seq-for-os-x/comment-page-1/

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1  
OS X has the similar jot. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 18 '09 at 0:57
    
thanks, learned a new command ;) –  miku Dec 18 '09 at 12:57
$ p=18
$ a='{1..$p}'
$ for num in $( eval echo $(eval echo $a) ); do echo $num; done
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This question should be linked to How do I iterate over a range of numbers in bash? -- it even contains a detailed discussion of the answers provided.

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