Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Pfff... how to get these dockpanels right ?

<DockPanel Grid.Row="1" LastChildFill="True" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch">
            <DockPanel Width="400" LastChildFill="False" HorizontalAlignment="Left">
                <DockPanel>
                    <TextBlock Width="400" />
                </DockPanel>
                <DockPanel  Height="35" DockPanel.Dock="Bottom" LastChildFill="False">
                    <Button x:Name="btnRefresh" Content="Refersh" />
                </DockPanel>
        </DockPanel>

The DockPanel with the TextBlock spans over the DockPanel that is docked at the bottom, I want it to fit right up to it. Any ideas?

Ok, it turns out: the panel docked at the bottom must preceed the dockpanel above it in the xaml declaration. LastChildFill="True" applies to the control that is declared last in the code.

<DockPanel Grid.Row="1" LastChildFill="True" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch">
            <DockPanel Width="400" LastChildFill="False" HorizontalAlignment="Left">
                <DockPanel  Height="35" DockPanel.Dock="Bottom" LastChildFill="False">
                    <Button x:Name="btnRefresh" Content="Refersh" />
                </DockPanel>
                <DockPanel>
                    <TextBlock Width="400" />
                </DockPanel>
        </DockPanel>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Please refer to the DockPanel Class page at MSDN which has all the help that you need. The XAML example from the linked page:

<DockPanel LastChildFill="True">
    <Border Height="25" Background="SkyBlue" BorderBrush="Black" BorderThickness="1" 
        DockPanel.Dock="Top">
        <TextBlock Foreground="Black">Dock = "Top"</TextBlock>
    </Border>
    <Border Height="25" Background="Blue" BorderBrush="Black" BorderThickness="1" 
        DockPanel.Dock="Top">
        <TextBlock Foreground="White">Dock = "Top"</TextBlock>
    </Border>
    <Border Height="25" Background="Yellow" BorderBrush="Black" BorderThickness="1" 
        DockPanel.Dock="Bottom">
        <TextBlock Foreground="Black">Dock = "Bottom"</TextBlock>
    </Border>
    <Border Width="200" Background="PaleGreen" BorderBrush="Black" BorderThickness="1" 
        DockPanel.Dock="Left">
        <TextBlock Foreground="Black">Dock = "Left"</TextBlock>
    </Border>
    <Border Background="White" BorderBrush="Black" BorderThickness="1">
        <TextBlock Foreground="Black">This will fill the remaining space</TextBlock>
    </Border>
</DockPanel>

Note the use of the DockPanel.Dock attached properties.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
I will look at your answer tomorrow. –  Gerard Oct 8 '13 at 16:00
    
+1 Well, I looked at it today and am grateful for the exhibit! What I don't get is how the system icon got disappeared... –  Gayot Fow Oct 8 '13 at 16:33
    
Ooops... I have a WPF application that I use to test answers in, such as this one, and it still has the code in it that I used to answer another question which was asking how to remove the Icon from a WPF Window. –  Sheridan Oct 8 '13 at 21:48
    
NIce example, for me the lesson learned is that LastChildFill="True" applies to the last control in the declaration, so the panel that is docked at the bottom must preceed the others in xaml. –  Gerard Oct 9 '13 at 11:02
    
Yeah, it's a strange concept, but it makes a bit more sense when you know about it. :) –  Sheridan Oct 9 '13 at 11:07
<DockPanel Grid.Row="1" LastChildFill="True" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch">
   <DockPanel Width="400" LastChildFill="False" HorizontalAlignment="Left">
       <Button x:Name="btnRefresh" Content="Refersh" 
               Height="35" DockPanel.Dock="Bottom" />

       <TextBlock Width="400" />
   </DockPanel>

   <!-- Other UI Elements here? -->

<DockPanel>
share|improve this answer
    
Well, your solution is not a stack of two dockpanels, but the fitting is correct. I discovered why that is: your controls are in different order, so the order is important. –  Gerard Oct 8 '13 at 15:55
    
@gerard you don't need a DockPanel or any other type of panel with a single child. It doesn't make sense. Panels are intended to have multiple children so that they can lay them out correctly. –  HighCore Oct 8 '13 at 15:57
    
the panels will get mulitple children, it was just an example. –  Gerard Oct 8 '13 at 15:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.