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So, here's the deal. I have a big array of floats between 0 and 1. I'd like a 1-D array of floats that counts how many instances are in a particular bin. There are 32 bins evenly spaced over the unit interval.

I thought that a normed histogram would do what I want, but I get some puzzling behaviour. Basically, the normalised histogram should return what I want (I would have thought) but it throws me values that are outside [0,1].

>>> from numpy import *
>>> import matplotlib. pyplot as plt
>>> a = random.normal(0.4,0.1,1024)
>>> plt.hist(a, bins=32,range = ([0,1]),normed=True)
(array([ 0.     ,  0.     ,  0.0625 ,  0.03125,  0.15625,  0.40625,
        0.5    ,  1.     ,  2.0625 ,  2.     ,  3.125  ,  3.65625,
        3.78125,  4.3125 ,  3.3125 ,  2.59375,  1.8125 ,  1.40625,
        0.90625,  0.34375,  0.375  ,  0.0625 ,  0.0625 ,  0.03125,
        0.     ,  0.     ,  0.     ,  0.     ,  0.     ,  0.     ,
        0.     ,  0.     ]), array([ 0.     ,  0.03125,  0.0625 ,  0.09375,  0.125  ,  0.15625,
        0.1875 ,  0.21875,  0.25   ,  0.28125,  0.3125 ,  0.34375,
        0.375  ,  0.40625,  0.4375 ,  0.46875,  0.5    ,  0.53125,
        0.5625 ,  0.59375,  0.625  ,  0.65625,  0.6875 ,  0.71875,
        0.75   ,  0.78125,  0.8125 ,  0.84375,  0.875  ,  0.90625,
        0.9375 ,  0.96875,  1.     ]), <a list of 32 Patch objects>)
>>> histogram(a, bins=32,range = ([0,1]),density=True)
(array([ 0.     ,  0.     ,  0.0625 ,  0.03125,  0.15625,  0.40625,
        0.5    ,  1.     ,  2.0625 ,  2.     ,  3.125  ,  3.65625,
        3.78125,  4.3125 ,  3.3125 ,  2.59375,  1.8125 ,  1.40625,
        0.90625,  0.34375,  0.375  ,  0.0625 ,  0.0625 ,  0.03125,
        0.     ,  0.     ,  0.     ,  0.     ,  0.     ,  0.     ,
        0.     ,  0.     ]), array([ 0.     ,  0.03125,  0.0625 ,  0.09375,  0.125  ,  0.15625,
        0.1875 ,  0.21875,  0.25   ,  0.28125,  0.3125 ,  0.34375,
        0.375  ,  0.40625,  0.4375 ,  0.46875,  0.5    ,  0.53125,
        0.5625 ,  0.59375,  0.625  ,  0.65625,  0.6875 ,  0.71875,
        0.75   ,  0.78125,  0.8125 ,  0.84375,  0.875  ,  0.90625,
        0.9375 ,  0.96875,  1.     ]))

This behaviour isn't just with small floats, in fact. If you make the normal distribution be centred on, say, 7.4 and move the range up to [7,8] you get the same puzzling behaviour.

You get the same behaviour with numpy's histogram function and matplotlib's hist. (which I think is a wrapper for the former? Sort of?)

Am I doing something dumb? Is this a bug? Is there a better way to create the array that represents the discrete distribution that approximates the data?

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I realised that it's pretty easy just to set normed = hist/float(sum(hist)) where hist is the un-normed histogram (which works fine). But it's puzzling that that isn't what happens anyway. –  Seamus Oct 8 '13 at 16:08
1  
The normalized output will integrate over the range of the bins to a value of 1. –  talonmies Oct 8 '13 at 16:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Am I doing something dumb?

Well, yes, in the sense that not reading the documentation when something is confusing is dumb, but to be honest I usually don't read the docs until much later than I should too, so I'm not in a great position to be throwing stones. :^)

From help(plt.hist):

normed : boolean, optional, default: False
    If `True`, the first element of the return tuple will
    be the counts normalized to form a probability density, i.e.,
    ``n/(len(x)`dbin)``, ie the integral of the histogram will sum to
    1. If *stacked* is also *True*, the sum of the histograms is
    normalized to 1.

Basically, what the normalization guarantees is

>>> a = np.random.normal(0.4,0.1,1024)
>>> n, bins, patches = plt.hist(a, bins=32,range = ([0,1]),normed=True)
>>> (np.diff(bins) * n).sum()
1.0
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