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I'm testing the behavior of running concurrent threads in C, with a thread function that runs infinitely. My question is why doesn't, in the below code, "HELLO!!!" gets printed? I thought pthread_create() is called and then immediately it goes to the next iteration of the loop, why is the code waiting for the 1st pthread_create() to finish? Aren't multiple threads supposed to be running concurrently?

void main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    pthread_t tid;
    int i;

    //Create 4 inf threads
    for (i=0;i< 4;i++)
    {
        //printf("hello!\n");
        //pthread_create(&tid, NULL, thread_incr, (void *)i);
        pthread_create(&tid, NULL, t_nostop, (void *)i);
        printf("HELLO!!!"); //This linen is NEVER printed!!
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void* t_nostop(void * argp)
{
    int i=1;
    int t_num=(int) argp;
    while(i==1){t_num++;}

}
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1 Answer 1

Multiple threads are supposed to run concurrently. This should be happening in your code.

I'd guess that the printf calls are executed but don't generate output immediately. Console output may be line buffered, so will only be displayed when you print a newline or flush.

Try either adding \n at the end of the string you print or adding fflush(stdout) after the printf.

Edit: A comment asked about line buffering...
Line buffering happens when the standard C library decides that console writes are relatively expensive and should only be attempted for coherent blocks of text. One easy definition for a coherent block is a line. While it is waiting for a newline to be entered, the C lib stores the contents of printf calls in a block of memory, appending subsequent printfs

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1  
Note that this would be done automatically, but you called pthread_exit instead of returning from main. –  zch Oct 8 '13 at 16:20
    
OK thanks that was it! Added \n and it was running fine! What is the meaning of line buffering, why is it happening without newline char? simonc –  jerryh91 Oct 8 '13 at 16:23
    
Glad that helped. Line buffering happens when the OS decides that console writes are relatively expensive and should only be attempted for coherent blocks of text. One easy definition for a coherent block is a line. While it is waiting for a newline to be entered, the OS stores the contents of printf calls in a block of memory, appending subsequent printfs. –  simonc Oct 8 '13 at 16:28
    
@simonc: Why not just add your nice comment to your answer? :-) –  alk Oct 8 '13 at 17:21
1  
Printf and threads is quite interesting. On Linux printfs in threads are guaranteed to be on their own line on the console. In the background there's buffers, semaphores and the like to ensure that a printf from one thread doesn't get mingled with a printf from another. An fprintf to stderr isn't buffered, so these can appear on the console before a printf that is supposed to be printed first! Also this demingling is not universally the case for all OSes. –  bazza Oct 9 '13 at 4:47

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