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What would be reasons to (or not to) cache property lookups that simply return the value of a private variable (or something cheap like that) when used more than once like below?

private sealed class Foo {

    public string MyString { get; set; )

}


private void MyMethod(Foo foo1)
{
    if (foo1.MyString != null)
    {
        DoSomething(foo1.MyString);

        if (foo1.MyString.Length != 0)
        {
            DoSomething2(foo1.MyString.Length);
        }
    }

}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What would be reasons to (or not to) cache property lookups that simply return the value of a private variable (or something cheap like that) when used more than once like below?

In general, if the property getter is just returning a field (like your examples), caching it will be unnecessary. These types of property access will typically get inlined by the JIT compiler, so caching will have little or no impact on the resulting runtime.

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Even if your getter does some reasonable computation to return the result it is still highly unlikely that caching the result would be worthwhile because in modern CPUs memory not CPU is typically the bottleneck.

I've seen cases where a well-meaning developer cached the results of string concatenations in private member variables in order to "make his code run faster" but the net effect is to slow the overall system down because he was simply stealing RAM from other parts of the system. Those other parts were using it to cache data coming off disk or off a network which is much much slower, so his performance gain (measured in micro seconds) came at the expense of performance elsewhere measured in milliseconds.

In general, avoid optimization until you have profiled your application and understand where the bottlenecks are and don't optimize on CPU alone, you need to look at memory and CPU when profiling.

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