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Cantor's Set of Countable infinite and Uncountable infinite Infinites

You may know and you may have proved that Set of Real Numbers Between 0 and 1 are Uncountably Infinite. Mean we Can not Map Every number of that set on a different Natural Number.

I got a Technique by which I would be able to Map all Real numbers between 0 and 1 on a different Natural Number. Technique is Simple Replace the Decimal Point with 1 and Map the Original on that Number Such that Map 0.0003 on 10003 and 0.03 on 103

By using this Technique we Would be able to Map all Real Numbers Between 0 and 1 on Natural Numbers. And All of those Natural Numbers will be starting with 1 so we will be having other Numbers as well on which No Number will be mapped like 2 or 211 or 79 So This Means Set of Natural Numbers is Grater then Real Numbers Between 0 and 1. So Set of Real Numbers Between 0 and 1 is Countably Infinite.

What's Ur Opinion ?

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This question appears to be off-topic because it is about math and has nothing to do with programming –  David Robinson Oct 8 '13 at 17:29
    
Incidentally, your logic is incorrect since real numbers can go on infinitely after the decimal point. Take pi-3, which is a real number (.14159265...) between 0 and 1. If you replace the decimal point with a 1 (114159265...), it will be infinitely large, and therefore not a natural number. –  David Robinson Oct 8 '13 at 17:31
    
Good Point , that was one of point due to which I share this here. My Argument is we Get a irrational number sequence when we take Under-root(2) or pi but when we are talking about numbers between 0 and 1 we are talking about numbers which are not infinite , because those are only created when use some mathematic operation on different numbers. –  Ayub Khan Oct 8 '13 at 17:37
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Furthermore, as soon as you say "it's a natural number of infinite length" you are conceding the point. There is no such thing as a natural number of infinite length. And if you redefine natural numbers to allow them to be of infinite length, then they are no longer countable –  David Robinson Oct 8 '13 at 17:48
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What is 1333...+1? An integer has to have a well defined and unique successor, so 1333... is not an integer. –  Joni Oct 9 '13 at 6:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The set of real numbers between 0 and 1 is uncountably infinite, as shown by Cantor's diagonal argument which you are familiar with.

What may be surprising to you is that the set of rational numbers between 0 and 1 is countably infinite. That is, there is a 1-to-1 correspondence between the integers and all fractions and numbers with a finite decimal expansion. You can find the proof here.

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Yeah im Absolutely familiar with Cantor's diagonal Argument and you know what I think its Useless Argument. its having flaws in it. –  Ayub Khan Oct 9 '13 at 2:24
    
@AyubKhan: What flaws would those be? –  David Robinson Oct 9 '13 at 2:39
    
Power Set of Natural Numbers surely will be greater then the Natural Numbers so we need More Natural Numbers to map them on them. –  Ayub Khan Oct 9 '13 at 4:55
    
In diagonal argument we define them till some point mean till that if we will be taking diagonal it will not be there but if we keep on moving we will get that diagonal. this will continue. –  Ayub Khan Oct 9 '13 at 4:57
    
There could be other ways to map those Numbers on Natural Numbers. Will discuss that after real numbers Problem. im using a different method to map them on natural numbers –  Ayub Khan Oct 9 '13 at 4:59

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