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This came up trying to write a test for a method of a class that calls a mock method with a closure. How would you verify the closure being called?

I know that you would be able to assert that the parameter is an instance of Closure. But how would you check anything about the closure?

For example how would you verify the function that is passed:

 class SUT {
     public function foo($bar) {
         $someFunction = function() { echo "I am an anonymous function"; };
         $bar->baz($someFunction);
     }
 }

 class SUTTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase {
     public function testFoo() {
         $mockBar = $this->getMockBuilder('Bar')
              ->setMethods(array('baz'))
              ->getMock();
         $mockBar->expects($this->once())
              ->method('baz')
              ->with( /** WHAT WOULD I ASSERT HERE? **/);

         $sut = new SUT();

         $sut->foo($mockBar);
     }
 }

You can't compare two closures in PHP. Is there a way in PHPUnit to execute the parameter passed in or in some way verify it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem is that you aren't injecting your dependency (the closure), which always makes unit testing harder, and can make isolation impossible.

Inject the closure into SUT::foo() instead of creating it inside there and you'll find testing much easier.

Here is how I would design the method (bearing in mind that I know nothing about your real code, so this may or may not be practical for you):

class SUT 
{
    public function foo($bar, $someFunction) 
    {
        $bar->baz($someFunction);
    }
}

class SUTTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase 
{
    public function testFoo() 
    {
        $someFunction = function() {};

        $mockBar = $this->getMockBuilder('Bar')
             ->setMethods(array('baz'))
             ->getMock();
        $mockBar->expects($this->once())
             ->method('baz')
             ->with($someFunction);

        $sut = new SUT();

        $sut->foo($mockBar, $someFunction);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so you suggest we do something like $someFunction = function() { echo "I am an anonymous function"; }; $sut = new SUT(); $sut->foo($bar, $someFunction);. How do we test it there? My point is, the anonymous function has to be defined somewhere. You can pass it up the call stack all you want, but eventually it has to be defined. So how do you test it? –  Travesty3 Oct 8 '13 at 19:35
    
@Travesty3: My answer contained the rewritten test showing you exactly how to test it. You test it just like you would anything else that uses injected dependencies - you mock the dependency and inject the mock. –  drrcknlsn Oct 8 '13 at 19:39
    
@Travesty3 You can have a factory class that returns the closures then you would be able to test the logic of the closure in isolation –  Schleis Oct 8 '13 at 19:39
    
@drrcknlsn: You're showing how to test the SUT::foo() method with the anonymous function mocked, but not how to test the anonymous function. What I mean is, how do you verify that "I am an anonymous function" gets echoed? –  Travesty3 Oct 8 '13 at 19:41
    
@Travesty3: The job of SUTTest::testFoo() is to verify that SUT::foo() behaves as expected. According to your pasted code, SUT::foo()'s only job is to call the function. The test in my answer verifies that the function is called, and so it has verified that SUT::foo() behaves as expected. If you need to test the function itself, then you can do so in another test suite dedicated to doing so. Provide it known good/bad inputs and verify the outputs (or side effects, as relevant). –  drrcknlsn Oct 8 '13 at 19:49

If the closure has some side effects inside SUT that could be verified by the test after the mock invocation, use returnCallback to provide another closure to be called with the passed arguments and have its return value returned to SUT. This will allow you to call SUT's closure to cause the side effects.

 class SUT {
     public function foo($bar) {
         $someFunction = function() { return 5 * 3; };
         return $bar->baz($someFunction);
     }
 }

 class SUTTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase {
     public function testFoo() {
         $mockBar = $this->getMockBuilder('Bar')
              ->setMethods(array('baz'))
              ->getMock();
         $mockBar->expects($this->once())
              ->method('baz')
              ->will($this->returnCallback(function ($someFunction) {
                  return $someFunction();
              }));

         $sut = new SUT();

         self::assertEquals(15, $sut->foo($mockBar));
     }
 }
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