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I have a similar problem to the one posted here.

I'm going to use the same DDL. But I'm also changing just one value, to illustrate where it's different.

Just like the example, I also have employees working many different jobs with different start and end times and when job times overlap I don't want to count twice any minutes that overlap. What's different is in my case some jobs span midnight into the next day and I don't want to include hours worked on the following day as part of the hours reported on the first day.

`USE Sandbox
GO

--CREATE TABLE Job
--(
--  JobID INT NOT NULL,
--  WorkerID INT NOT NULL,
--  JobStart DATETIME NOT NULL,
--  JobEnd DATETIME NOT NULL
--);

--INSERT INTO Job2 (JobID, WorkerID, JobStart, JobEnd)
--VALUES 
--(1, 25, '2012-11-17 16:00', '2012-11-17 17:00'),
--(2, 25, '2012-11-18 16:00', '2012-11-18 16:50'),
--(3, 25, '2012-11-19 18:00', '2012-11-20 18:30'),
--(4, 25, '2012-11-19 18:30', '2012-11-19 18:10'),
--(5, 26, '2012-11-18 16:00', '2012-11-18 17:10'),
--(6, 26, '2012-11-19 16:00', '2012-11-19 16:50');



IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#time') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
drop table #time
END
DECLARE @FromDate AS DATETIME,
     @ToDate AS DATETIME,
     @Current AS DATETIME
SET @FromDate = '2012-11-17 16:00'
SET @ToDate = '2012-11-20 18:30'

create table #time  (cte_start_date datetime)
set @current = @FromDate
while (@current < @ToDate)
begin

insert into #time (cte_start_date)
values (@current)

set @current = DATEADD(n, 1, @current)

end

----query to edit
SELECT J.WorkerID 
,COUNT(DISTINCT t.cte_start_date) AS TotalTime
FROM #time AS t
INNER JOIN Job2 AS J ON t.cte_start_date >= J.JobStart AND t.cte_start_date < J.JobEnd  
GROUP BY J.WorkerID 

drop table #time`

See on JobID = 3, a job starts at 2012-11-19 18:00 and doesn't end until 2012-11-20 18:30, the next day.

Result set should be:

WorkerID 26 TotalTime 120
WorkerID 25 TotalTime 470 (and not 1580)

How do I modify this query so that only 6 hours of jobID 3 are allocated to hours worked on 11-19, and the other 6.5 hours are allocated to hours worked on 11-20?

share|improve this question
    
and the other 6.5 hours are allocated to hours worked on 11-20? Shouldn't there be 18 hours worked on 11-20? –  Khan Oct 8 '13 at 19:38
    
Yes, you are very right Khan. Thanks for catching that. I am not allowed to disregard the hours the employee worked past midnight. I need to track daily hours worked, regardless of how many days spanned, and not lose track of any hours. Also, there is also the likelihood of the job spanning even two days so then I would need 3 date buckets for one job and one employee. –  coldCoughee Oct 8 '13 at 20:10

2 Answers 2

This will split jobs spanning two days into their own records, one for each day, then apply the algorithm you already have. Note that if jobs could span more than two days, this wouldn't work:

SQL Fiddle

;with JobByDay( Day, JobId, WorkerId, StartTime, EndTime )
as
(
  select
    CAST( JobStart as Date ) Day
    , JobId
    , WorkerId
    , JobStart StartTime
    , EndTime = case
        when CAST( JobStart as Date ) < CAST( JobEnd as Date )
          then dateadd( dd, 1, CAST( JobStart as Date ) )
          else JobEnd
        end
  from
    Job

  union

  select
    CAST( JobEnd as Date ) Day
    , JobId
    , WorkerId
    , Cast( JobEnd as Date ) StartTime
    , JobEnd EndTime
  from
    Job
  where
    CAST( JobStart as Date ) < CAST( JobEnd as Date )
)

select
  * 
from
  JobByDay
order by
  WorkerId, Day
share|improve this answer

You just need to make sure that all the times from your temp table are on the same date as start date. I'll post just the modified select part, the rest stays the same.

In SQL Server 2008 or higher:

SELECT J.WorkerID 
,COUNT(DISTINCT t.cte_start_date) AS TotalTime
FROM #time AS t
INNER JOIN Job AS J ON t.cte_start_date >= J.JobStart AND t.cte_start_date < J.JobEnd
and dateadd(d, 0, t.cte_start_date as date) = cast(J.JobStart as date)
GROUP BY J.WorkerID 

On SQL Server 2005 and below:

SELECT J.WorkerID 
,COUNT(DISTINCT t.cte_start_date) AS TotalTime
FROM #time AS t
INNER JOIN Job AS J ON t.cte_start_date >= J.JobStart AND t.cte_start_date < J.JobEnd
and DateAdd(d, 0, DateDiff(d, t.cte_start_date, 0)) = DateAdd(d, 0, DateDiff(d, J.JobStart, 0))
GROUP BY J.WorkerID 

EDIT

You can use the query below to get times on each date (split by midnight) - full query:

    DECLARE @FromDate AS DATETIME,
     @ToDate AS DATETIME,
     @Current AS DATETIME
SET @FromDate = '2012-11-17 16:00'
SET @ToDate = '2012-11-21 18:30'

create table #time  (cte_start_date datetime)
set @current = @FromDate
while (@current < @ToDate)
begin

insert into #time (cte_start_date)
values (@current)

set @current = DATEADD(n, 1, @current)

end

    --query to edit
SELECT J.WorkerID, CAST(t.cte_start_date as date) as WorkedDate
,COUNT(DISTINCT t.cte_start_date) AS TotalTime
FROM #time AS t
INNER JOIN Job AS J ON t.cte_start_date >= J.JobStart AND t.cte_start_date < J.JobEnd
GROUP BY J.WorkerID, CAST(t.cte_start_date as date)
share|improve this answer
    
Szymon, That worked and I guess that's pretty simple. Why do you have to cast as date for the last and/comparison? –  coldCoughee Oct 8 '13 at 19:54
    
I'm casting to compare date only part (without time), that's an easy way to do it. –  Szymon Oct 8 '13 at 19:55
    
problem with this is that the hours that empID 25 worked past midnight are lost. I need to capture the hours worked past midnight and put them in their own 2012-11-20 date 'bucket' for employee 25. –  coldCoughee Oct 8 '13 at 20:05
    
See my edit, that will give you time for each date (split by midnight), you can then use that info as you want. –  Szymon Oct 8 '13 at 20:10
    
Szymon, the result set from EDITted query gives only 3 rows for EmpID 25. 60 min TotalTime on 11-17, 50 min TotalTime on 11-18, and 60 (instead of 360 minutes) for TotalTime on 11-19 and no result for TotalTime worked on 11-20, which should be 1110 minutes (18.5 hours). –  coldCoughee Oct 8 '13 at 20:22

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