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Does anyone know how to convert this line from C++ to C programming language? I could convert almost everything, I just need some help where it is marked as "HELP".

 string original = "blablabla";
 string encrypted = "";
 string unencrypt = "";
 char key = 'x';

 for (int temp = 0; temp < original.size(); temp++){
  HELP-> encrypted += original[temp] ^ (int(key) + temp) % 255; <-HELP
 }

Thanks in advaced!

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marked as duplicate by bizzehdee, 1'', Paul Griffiths, Dave, jxh Oct 8 '13 at 19:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Please post the "C" conversion as you have it. –  kfsone Oct 8 '13 at 19:02
2  
malloc a char array large enough to fit the encrypted string, then do essentially what the code already does, except it would be ecrypted[temp] = instead of encrypted +=. –  Michael Oct 8 '13 at 19:03
    
What is the error generated by the compiler? –  Thomas Matthews Oct 8 '13 at 19:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Presumably you need to convert your string to char[] arrays.

const char* original = "blablabla";
int len = strlen(original);
char* encrypted = malloc(len + 1);
int key = 'x';

for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
    encrypted[i] = (char)((original[i] ^ (key + i)) & 0xff);
}

encrypted[len] = '\0';

// ... do work with encrypted

free(encrypted);

If "encrypted" is never going to be very large, and there's no chance of recursion, you can replace 'malloc' with 'alloca' to allocate the memory on the stack, in which case you don't need to free it.

const char* original = "blablabla";
int len = strlen(original);
char* encrypted = alloca(len + 1);
int key = 'x';

for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
    encrypted[i] = (char)((original[i] ^ (key + i)) & 0xff);
}

encrypted[len] = '\0';

// ... do work with encrypted

// do not free encrypted, it's on the stack.

This version is more like the C++ version because encrypted automatically goes away when it goes out of scope.

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int(key) needs to be (int) key in C. –  Ferruccio Oct 8 '13 at 19:08
    
Actually, it'd need to be size_t, so I cleaned that whole mess up :) –  kfsone Oct 8 '13 at 19:09
    
Better still, int's for everyone :) –  kfsone Oct 8 '13 at 19:10
    
Thank you very much, it worked! ;) –  Erik Figueiredo Oct 8 '13 at 19:23
    
+1, only answer so far that doesn't put the strlen() call in the loop condition. –  Paul Griffiths Oct 8 '13 at 19:27
 char original[] = "blablabla";
 char encrypted[sizeof(original)] = {0};
 char unencrypt[sizeof(original)] = {0};
 char key = 'x';

 for (int i = 0, len = strlen(original); i < len; i++){
   encrypted[i] = original[i] ^ (int(key) + i) % 255;
 }
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Really i haven't looked at this closely, perhaps something like:

char * original = "blablabla";
char * encrypted = calloc(strlen(original)+1,1);
char * unencrypt = calloc(strlen(original)+1,1);
 char key = 'x';

 for (int temp = 0; temp < strlen(original); temp++){
   encrypted[temp] += original[temp] ^ (int(key) + temp) % 255;
 }

free(encrypted);
free(unencrypt);
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