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I know people asked this before but Ι can't find a solution.

I'm trying to check if a string matches this next pattern: capital or not letter "x" and then any number (no dots or anything else).

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sorry if my english is not that good, hope you understand –  Gigalala Oct 8 '13 at 19:01
2  
the only thing that could use clarification is what you mean by "any number". Is x542 valid? or only a single digit like x5? –  Cruncher Oct 8 '13 at 19:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The regex for this would be [xX]\d. The thing in the brackets is a list of characters you want to match on. You want to match on upper or lower case "X" so that accomplishes it. Then you want to match on any digit. That's what \d does. \d means "any digit". Here's how you can run this in java code:

package com.sandbox;

public class Sandbox {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String s = "x9";
        System.out.println(s.matches("[xX]\\d"));
    }
}

Notice how there's two backslashes in the String. That's because \ is an escape character. In java, you want to actually use a \ symbol and to do that you have to escape the \ symbol by typing \\.

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but does this regex make sure this "x34g" wont work? –  Gigalala Oct 8 '13 at 19:15
    
@Gigalala Yes. Change s to "x34g" for yourself and you'll see that it won't work. –  Daniel Kaplan Oct 8 '13 at 19:16

You likely want

[xX]\d

Note that in a string literal we need to escape the backslash: "[xX]\\d".

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You can use this regex:

"(?i)^x\\d+$"
  1. (?i) is for ignore case matching to match x or X
  2. \d+ is for matching 1 or more digits [0-9]
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If I understand your requirement:

(x|X)[0-9]+

This first matches either "x" or "X" (| is or). Then it matches 1 or more characters from the group [0-9] which are obviously digits.

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