Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I develop a RogueLike in python, and i try to make my best with OOP and my little knowledge to construct a python course for student.

mapRogue = ['~~~~~~~~~~',
            '~~~~.....Y',
            'YYYYY+YYYY',
            'YYYY....YY']

I want to transform this string map into 2D list containing object defining the nature of my tile in the RogueLike. For that i decide to use a dictionnary to map character key and class to instantiate when i read this variable mapRogue

I find a solution using inheritance, but imho this code is not really as elegant as i want, and probably not very flexible if i want to add other type of tile behavior later...

DOOR class using inheritance

class Tile(object):
    #a tile of the map and its properties
    def __init__(self, name, char, position, blocked, color=(255, 255, 255), bgcolor=(0, 0, 0)):
        self.name = name
        self.blocked = blocked
        self.char = char
        self.color = color
        self.bgcolor = bgcolor
        self.position = position

class Door(Tile):
    def __init__(self,  name, char, position, blocked, bgcolor, key,color=(255, 255, 255), open=False ):
        Tile.__init__( self,name, char, position, blocked, color, bgcolor)
        self.state = open
        self.key = key

    def opening(self, key):
        if self.key == key:
            self.state = True

tilesObject = {".": {"name": 'floor', "obj": Tile, "bgcolor": (233, 207, 177), "block": False},
               "Y": {"name": 'forest', "obj": Tile, "bgcolor": (25, 150, 64), "block": True},
               "~": {"name": 'water', "obj": Tile, "bgcolor": (10, 21, 35), "block": False},
               "+": {"name": 'doors', "obj": Door, "bgcolor": (10, 10, 25), "block": False}}
import types
def load(mymap):
    tileMap = []
    x, y = (0,0)
    for line in mymap:
        tileLine = []
        for value in line:
            try:
                tile = tilesObject[value]
            except KeyError:
                return "Error on key"
            if tile["obj"].__name__ ==  "Door":
                obj = tile["obj"](name=tile["name"], position=(x, y), char=value, blocked=tile["block"],bgcolor=tile["bgcolor"], key="42isTheKey", open=False)
            else:
                obj = tile["obj"](name=tile["name"], position=(x, y), char=value, blocked=tile["block"],bgcolor=tile["bgcolor"])

            x += 1
            tileLine.append(obj)
        x = 0
        y += 1
        tileMap.append(tileLine)
    return tileMap


for line in load(mapRogue):
    for obj in line:
        print obj , "\n"

DOOR class using composition

I suspect there is an other answer using composition and/or strategy pattern, so i try to decorate the Tile object with Door behavior, but i'm blocked with this dictionnary ...

Actually i try multiple solution without success, do you have a proposition to help me to solve this problem of conception using elegant oop and python ?

class Tile(object):
    #a tile of the map and its properties
    def __init__(self, name, char, position, blocked, color=(255, 255, 255), bgcolor=(0, 0, 0), door=None):
        self.name = name
        self.blocked = blocked
        self.char = char
        self.color = color
        self.bgcolor = bgcolor
        self.door = door
        self.position = position

# Door decorate the Tile object using composition
class Door(object):
    def __init__(self, key, open=False):
        self.state = open
        self.key = key

    def opening(self, key):
        if self.key == key:
            self.state = True

tilesObject = {".": {"name": 'floor', "obj": Tile, "bgcolor": (233, 207, 177), "block": False},
               "Y": {"name": 'forest', "obj": Tile, "bgcolor": (25, 150, 64), "block": True},
               "~": {"name": 'water', "obj": Tile, "bgcolor": (10, 21, 35), "block": False},
               "+": {"name": 'doors', "obj": Door, "bgcolor": (10, 10, 25), "block": False}}

def load(mymap):
    tileMap = []
    x, y = (0,0)
    for line in mymap:
        tileLine = []
        for value in line:
            try:
                tile = tilesObject[value]
            except KeyError:
                return "Error on key"

            # Here i need to detect when obj is Door 
                    # because i need to define a special Tile 
                    # decorated by Door behavior, 
                    # so it seems this is not a good solution :/

            x += 1
            tileLine.append(obj)
        x = 0
        y += 1
        tileMap.append(tileLine)
    return tileMap

An update with some informations :

Thanks for answer @User and @Hyperborreus, you're right, i simplify my example here, and in my code, i have two layer :

  • the Tile which don't move,
  • and the GameObjects which can move, attack, defend, and a lot of other function decorated using composition like in this tutorial here

Using pygame, i display all my Tiles object using a draw_tile() function.

So at this point i need a link between Door and Tile class to compute correctly a fov for player later, because Door have behavior and limit the vision of my character (with an attributes blocked or fovState). After that, i drawn all gameObject, on top of these already drawed Tile surfaces. Door is part of computation only specific to Tile, and other things in roguelike so that explain why i define the Door like that i hope.

So probably you're right with your proposition of game definition dictionnary, i need to change the way i instatiate object, the oop definition of Door / Tiles rest the same, but when i read the initial string map which contain item, door and also static object, i separate gameObject instatiation and Tile instatiation..

The idea of dictionnary to instatiate element on a rogueLike map defined in string list is based on the idea founded here : https://bitbucket.org/BigYellowCactus/dropout/

Perhaps the creator of this code, @dominic-kexel can also help us to on this point ?

share|improve this question
    
Why does the inheritance approach irk you? –  Hyperboreus Oct 8 '13 at 20:10
    
The if test is not really good, and if i have 10 type of tile, i have ten if to test the name of class, it's not very flexible, so if there is another solution more elegant to make the same thing, that's great ? –  reyman64 Oct 8 '13 at 20:15
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

IMHO, you should make a distinction between "tiles" (the underlying basemap) and "objects" (things the player can interact with, like doors that open, dragons that attack, or pits that kill).

If you want to compare this with a 3D-video game, the "tiles" would be the environment you cannot interact with, and the "objects" would be the clickable things.

The mere tiles can be instances of one single class and hold the information relevant and common to all tiles, like rendering hints (which character in which colour) or movement aspects (can be passed, movement speed, etc).

The objects are then placed on top of the tiles.

Imagine you have a map with a lot of floor and walls, and at two positions you have two doors. All "tiles" behave the same (you can walk on floor, no matter which floor tile) but you will butt your head against a wall (no matter where the wall is). But the doors are different: One door requires the "Green Key" and the other door requires the "Embroidered Key of the Dissident Pixie".

This difference is where your if-issue arises. The door needs extra information. In order to define a map, you need all tiles (identical within each class) and another lists of objects placed on certain tiles (each object different).

Doors, Wells, Dragons, Switches etc could inherit from a common base class which implements standard actions like "inspect", "interact", "attack", "yell at", and maybe special interfaces for special actions.

So a complete game definition could look like this:

game = {'baseMap': '#here comes your 2D array of tiles',
'objects': [ {'class': Door, 'position': (x, y), 'other Door arguments': ...}, 
{'class': Door, 'position': (x2, y2), 'other Door arguments': ...},
{'class': Dragon, 'position': (x3, y3), 'dragon arguments': ...}, ] }

Then for instantiating the actual objects (object in the OO sense, not in the game sense), walk throught this definition, and call the c'tor of each object with the dictionary items as keyword-arguments (double-asterisk). This is only one possible approach of many.

For rendering, display the tile presentation if the tile is empty, or the object representation if there is an object on the tile.


This is what I mean with double-asterisk:

class Door:
    def __init__ (self, position, colour, creaking = True):
        print (position, colour, creaking)

objDefs = [...,
          {'class': Door, 'kwargs': {'position': (2, 3), 'colour': 'black'} },
          ...]

#Here you actually iterate over objDefs
objDef = objDefs [1]
obj = objDef ['class'] (**objDef ['kwargs'] )

Big Edit:

This is an idea of how one could implement the rendering of the map with both tiles and objects. (Just my two cents):

#! /usr/bin/python3.2

colours = {'white': 7, 'green': 2, 'blue': 4, 'black': 0, 'yellow': 3}

class Tile:
    data = {'.': ('Floor', 'white', True),
        'Y': ('Forest', 'green', False),
        '~': ('Water', 'blue', False) }

    def __init__ (self, code, position):
        self.code = code
        self.position = position
        self.name, self.colour, self.passable = Tile.data [code]

    def __str__ (self):
        return '\x1b[{}m{}'.format (30 + colours [self.colour], self.code)

class GameObject:
    #here got he general interfaces common to all game objects
    def __str__ (self):
        return '\x1b[{}m{}'.format (30 + colours [self.colour], self.code)

class Door (GameObject):
    def __init__ (self, code, position, colour, key):
        self.code = code
        self.position = position
        self.colour = colour
        self.key = key

    def close (self): pass
        #door specific interface

class Dragon (GameObject):
    def __init__ (self, code, position, colour, stats):
        self.code = code
        self.position = position
        self.colour = colour
        self.stats = stats

    def bugger (self): pass
        #dragon specific interface

class Map:
    def __init__ (self, codeMap, objects):
        self.tiles = [ [Tile (c, (x, y) ) for x, c in enumerate (line) ] for y, line in enumerate (codeMap) ]
        self.objects = {obj ['args'] ['position']: obj ['cls'] (**obj ['args'] ) for obj in objects}

    def __str__ (self):
        return '\n'.join (
            ''.join (str (self.objects [ (x, y) ] if (x, y) in self.objects else tile)
                for x, tile in enumerate (line) )
            for y, line in enumerate (self.tiles)
            ) + '\n\x1b[0m'

mapRouge = ['~~~~~~~~~~',
            '~~~~.....Y',
            'YYYYY.YYYY',
            'YYYY....YY']

objects = [ {'cls': Door,
        'args': {'code': '.', 'position': (5, 2), 'colour': 'black',
        'key': 'Ancient Key of Constipation'} },
    {'cls': Dragon,
        'args': {'code': '@',  'position': (7, 3), 'colour': 'yellow',
        'stats': {'ATK': 20, 'DEF': 20} } } ]

theMap = Map (mapRouge, objects)
print (theMap)

And this is the result:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for answer, you're right, i simplify my example here, but in my code, i have two layer, the Tile which don't move, and the GameObjects which can move, attack, defend, and a lot of other function decorated using composition like here roguebasin.roguelikedevelopment.org/… etc. So probably you're right with your proposition of game definition, perhaps i need to move the Door into the GameObjects list. Can you provide an example or a link to this double asterisk instatiation, i'm interested ? –  reyman64 Oct 8 '13 at 21:14
    
I edited my answer and included an example of what I mean by kwargs and double-asterisk. –  Hyperboreus Oct 8 '13 at 22:21
    
Thanks again, with this technics is it possible to pass argument during iteration you think ? If i want to specify the (x,y) of object based on my loop over 2DList of string for example ? –  reyman64 Oct 9 '13 at 13:48
    
Either pass the position tuple into the kwarg dictionary and pass this dictionary, or pass it as a first positional argument, before the kwargs. Both ways are viable. –  Hyperboreus Oct 9 '13 at 15:27
1  
@reyman64 Please see my last edit. This is one of many possible way of implement the map. Maybe you can grab one idea or two from it. (Please run it on a console that understands ANSI escapes, so you can see the colours). –  Hyperboreus Oct 9 '13 at 17:27
show 1 more comment

Here a simple solution to your problem:

kw = tile.copy()
cls = kw.pop('obj')
obj = cls(**kw)

does the same as

        if tile["obj"].__name__ ==  "Door":
            obj = tile["obj"](name=tile["name"], position=(x, y), char=value, blocked=tile["block"],bgcolor=tile["bgcolor"], key="42isTheKey", open=False)
        else:
            obj = tile["obj"](name=tile["name"], position=(x, y), char=value, blocked=tile["block"],bgcolor=tile["bgcolor"])

And this is because I value what you do:

I would agree with Hyperboreus that you make a difference between the position = the tile and what is placed on top if the tile.

What worked really well in another game is that tiles are connected:

class Tile:
    def __init__(self):
        self.left_tile = None
        self.right_tile = None
        ...
        self.content = [FreeSpaceToWalk()]

    def can_I_walk_there(self, person):
        for content in self.content:
            if not content.can_I_walk_there(person): return False
        return True

This way you can make portals by connecting tiles that are not neighbors by position.

Here are some contents:

class Door:
    password = '42'
    def can_I_walk_there(self, person):
        return person.what_is_the_password_for(self) == self.password

class FreeSpaceToWalk:
    def can_I_walk_there(self, person):
        return True

class Wall:
    def can_I_walk_there(self, person):
        return False
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.