Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anyone help me understand why the following Python script returns True?

x = ''
y = all(i == ' ' for i in x)
print(y)

I imagine it's something to do with x being a zero-length entity, but cannot fully comprehend.

share|improve this question
1  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuous_truth –  Blender Oct 8 '13 at 20:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

all() always returns True unless there is an element in the sequence that is False.

Your loop produces 0 items, so True is returned.

This is documented:

Return True if all elements of the iterable are true (or if the iterable is empty).

Emphasis mine.

Similarly, any() will always return False, unless an element in the sequence is True, so for empty sequences, any() returns the default:

>>> any(True for _ in '')
False
share|improve this answer

As the documentation states, what all does is:

Return True if all elements of the iterable are true (or if the iterable is empty).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.