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How does one stop a batch file completely when in a called loop?

exit /b merely quits the :label loop, not the entire batch file, while bare exit exits the batchfile and the parent CMD shell, which is not desired.

@echo off
call :check_ntauth

REM if check fails, the next lines should not execute
echo. ...About to "rmdir /q/s %temp%\*"
goto :eof

:check_ntauth
  if not `whoami` == "nt authority\system" goto :not_sys_account
  goto :eof

:not_sys_account
  echo. &echo. Error: must be run as "nt authority\system" user. &echo.
  exit /b
  echo. As desired, this line is never executed.

results:

d:\temp>whoami
mydomain\matt

d:\temp>break-loop-test.bat

 Error: must be run as "nt authority\system" user.

 ...About to "rmdir /q/s d:\temp\systmp\*"     <--- shouldn't be seen!
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can set the ERRORLEVEL from the :not_sys_account subroutine and use it as a return value. The main procedure can check this and change its behavior:

@echo off
call :check_ntauth

REM if check fails, the next lines should not execute
if errorlevel 1 goto :eof
echo. ...About to "rmdir /q/s %temp%\*"
goto :eof

:check_ntauth
  if not `whoami` == "nt authority\system" goto :not_sys_account
  goto :eof

:not_sys_account
  echo. &echo. Error: must be run as "nt authority\system" user. &echo.
  exit /b 1
  echo. As desired, this line is never executed.

The diff from the original code is that exit /b 1 now specifies an ERRORLEVEL and the check if errorlevel 1 goto :eof terminates the script if the ERRORLEVEL is set.

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You can stop it with a syntax error.

:not_sys_account
    echo Error: ....
    call :HALT

:HALT
call :__halt 2>nul
:__halt
()

The HALT function stops the batch file, it uses itself a second function so it can supress the output of the syntax error by redirection to nul

share|improve this answer
    
Superb! I'll have to give this a try next time I need it. I usually set a variable a the beginning like: fatalError=0, then set it to fatalError=1 on an error, and check the value on return from :calls. –  Kevin Fegan Oct 8 '13 at 21:06
    
I like this, thanks for the idea. I ended up giving Jon the nod though because that approach feels cleaner to me for something that will be maintained in future by someone else. –  matt wilkie Oct 10 '13 at 21:14

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