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I have a 2-d dictionary in the following format:

myDict = {('a','b'):10, ('a','c'):20, ('a','d'):30, ('b','c'):40, ('b','d'):50,('c','d'):60}

How can I write this into a tab-delimited file so that the file contains the following. While filling a tuple (x, y) will fill two locations: (x,y) and (y,x). (x,x) is always 0.

The output would be :

    a   b   c   d
a   0   10  20  30
b   10  0   40  50
c   20  40  0   60
d   30  50  60  0 

PS: If somehow the dictionary can be converted into a dataframe (using pandas) then it can be easily written into a file using pandas function

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
In [49]: data = map(list, zip(*myDict.keys())) + [myDict.values()]

In [50]: df = DataFrame(zip(*data)).set_index([0, 1])[2].unstack()

In [52]: df.combine_first(df.T).fillna(0)
Out[52]: 
    a   b   c   d
a   0  10  20  30
b  10   0  40  50
c  20  40   0  60
d  30  50  60   0

For posterity: If you are just tuning in, check out Phillip Cloud's answer below for a neater way to construct df.

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Well I guess the tide turned for you :) –  Phillip Cloud Oct 9 '13 at 16:19
    
Ha! Thanks for the assist, buddy. –  Dan Allan Oct 9 '13 at 17:49

You can do this with the lesser-known align method and a little unstack magic:

In [122]: s = Series(myDict, index=MultiIndex.from_tuples(myDict))

In [123]: df = s.unstack()

In [124]: lhs, rhs = df.align(df.T)

In [125]: res = lhs.add(rhs, fill_value=0).fillna(0)

In [126]: res
Out[126]:
    a   b   c   d
a   0  10  20  30
b  10   0  40  50
c  20  40   0  60
d  30  50  60   0

Finally, to write this to a CSV file, use the to_csv method:

In [128]: res.to_csv('res.csv', sep='\t')

In [129]: !cat res.csv
        a       b       c       d
a       0.0     10.0    20.0    30.0
b       10.0    0.0     40.0    50.0
c       20.0    40.0    0.0     60.0
d       30.0    50.0    60.0    0.0

If you want to keep things as integers, cast using DataFrame.astype(), like so:

In [137]: res.astype(int).to_csv('res.csv', sep='\t')

In [138]: !cat res.csv
        a       b       c       d
a       0       10      20      30
b       10      0       40      50
c       20      40      0       60
d       30      50      60      0

(It was cast to float because of the intermediate step of filling in nan values where indices from one frame were missing from the other)

@Dan Allan's answer using combine_first is nice:

In [130]: df.combine_first(df.T).fillna(0)
Out[130]:
    a   b   c   d
a   0  10  20  30
b  10   0  40  50
c  20  40   0  60
d  30  50  60   0

Timings:

In [134]: timeit df.combine_first(df.T).fillna(0)
100 loops, best of 3: 2.01 ms per loop

In [135]: timeit lhs, rhs = df.align(df.T); res = lhs.add(rhs, fill_value=0).fillna(0)
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.27 ms per loop

Those timings are probably a bit polluted by construction costs, so what do things look like with some really huge frames?

In [143]: df = DataFrame({i: randn(1e7) for i in range(1, 11)})

In [144]: df2 = DataFrame({i: randn(1e7) for i in range(10)})

In [145]: timeit lhs, rhs = df.align(df2); res = lhs.add(rhs, fill_value=0).fillna(0)
1 loops, best of 3: 4.41 s per loop

In [146]: timeit df.combine_first(df2).fillna(0)
1 loops, best of 3: 2.95 s per loop

DataFrame.combine_first() is faster for larger frames.

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Nice analysis. I deleted my answer in shame when I saw your superior construction, so much cleaner than all my zipping. Nice to see align used, also. I'll restore it for combine_first.... –  Dan Allan Oct 9 '13 at 3:00
1  
Clearly you haven't seen my dirty er... zipping here. :) –  Phillip Cloud Oct 9 '13 at 3:24

Not as elegant as I'd like (and not using pandas) but until you find something better:

adj = dict()
for ((u, v), w) in myDict.items():
  if u not in adj: adj[u] = dict()
  if v not in adj: adj[v] = dict()
  adj[u][v] = adj[v][u] = w
keys = adj.keys()

print '\t' + '\t'.join(keys)
for u in keys:
  def f(v):
    try:
      return str(adj[u][v])
    except KeyError:
      return "0"
  print u + '\t' + '\t'.join(f(v) for v in keys)

or equivalently (if you don't want to construct the adjacency matrix):

k = dict()
for ((u, v), w) in myDict.items():
  k[u] = k[v] = True
keys = k.keys()

print '\t' + '\t'.join(keys)
for u in keys:
  def f(v):
    if (u, v) in myDict:
      return str(myDict[(u, v)])
    elif (v, u) in myDict:
      return str(myDict[(v, u)])
    else:
      return "0"
  print u + '\t' + '\t'.join(f(v) for v in keys)
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Got it working using pandas package.

#Find all column names 
z = []
[z.extend(x) for x in myDict.keys()]
colnames = sorted(set(z))

#Create an empty DataFrame  using pandas 
myDF  =  DataFrame(index= colnames, columns = colnames )
myDF  =  myDF.fillna(0) #Initialize with zeros
#Fill each item one by one 
for val in myDict:
    myDF[val[0]][val[1]] = myDict[val]
    myDF[val[1]][val[0]] = myDict[val]

#Write to a file 
outfilename = "matrixCooccurence.txt"
myDF.to_csv(outfilename, sep="\t", index=True, header=True, index_label = "features" )
share|improve this answer
    
It's very unclear that this does what you originally asked. This is also unnecessarily low-level for pandas. pandas is designed to allow to do simple tasks like these with relative ease. For example, why would you create a nan frame only to immediately fill it with zeros when you can just create one a single line with np.zeros? You're also using chained assignment which is heavily frowned upon because of the view-vs-copy distinction. Finally, looping over the values in the dict wil be slower than throwing it into a Series which is backed by numpy arrays. –  Phillip Cloud Oct 8 '13 at 22:38

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