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I have a few questions about this code here. What I'm trying to do is write a function that takes 2 inputs, a list and an option, which the option is either 0 or 1, and returns a list of numbers in the list. If the option is 0, it will return numbers that are greater than 5 or less than -5. If the option is 1, it will return a list of all the odd numbers on the first list. This is what I have for code right now:

def splitList(myList, option):
    nList = []
    for element in range(0,len(myList)):
        if option == 0:
            if myList[element] > 5:
                nList.append(element)
    return nList

Right now I got it to return a list of if the elements are greater than 5, but it returns where they are in the list, not the actually value. Say I ran the program

splitList([-6,4,7,8,3], 0)

it would return [2, 3]

I want it too return the values of 7 and 8 and also -6 but I know I don't have the right code to return -6 as of now. Can someone guide me in the right direction. Also, I want to be using a for loop here. Also I have no clue how to return odd numbers if the option is 1.

Here is my code which works:

def splitList(myList, option):
    nList = []
    for element in myList:
        if option == 0:
            if abs(element) > 5:
                nList.append(element)
        elif option == 1:
            if element % 2:
                nList.append(element)
    return nList

How would I be able to switch this to a while loop? I tried the following code but it does not seem to work:

def splitList2(myList, option):
    nList = []
    element = 0 
    while element < len(myList):
        if option == 0:
            if abs(element) > 5:
                nList.append(element)
        elif option == 1:
            if element % 2:
                nList.append(element)
        element = element + 1
    return nList
share|improve this question
    
You have nList.append(element) where apparently you want nList.append(myList[element]). –  tripleee Oct 8 '13 at 22:01
    
You also need abs() or an or statement if you want the absolute value greater than 5... –  beroe Oct 8 '13 at 22:02
    
Odd numbers are numbers for which number % 2 is not 0. –  tripleee Oct 8 '13 at 22:02
    
BTW, you should get in the habit of accepting an answer to your questions, when people work so hard to solve things for you. (Not me, but others...) –  beroe Oct 8 '13 at 22:03
    
@beroe I apologize, not familiar with this site and how it runs. –  Ryan Erickson Oct 8 '13 at 22:11
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Despite naming your variable element, it's actually the index, not the element at that index.

You can tell that because you have to use myList[element] to compare it.

So, to fix it, do the same thing again:

nList.append(myList[element])

However, there's a much simpler way to do this: Just loop over the elements directly.

nList = []
for element in nList:
    if option == 0:
        if element > 5:
            nList.append(element)
return nList

You almost never want to loop over range(len(spam)). Usually, you just want the elements, so just loop over spam itself. Sometimes you need the indexes and the elements, so loop over enumerate(spam). If you really just need the indexes… step back and make sure you really do (often people think they want this only because they don't know about zip, or because they're trying to make changes in-place instead of copying, but doing it in a way that won't work).

Or, even more simply:

if option != 0:
    return []
return [element for element in nList if element > 5]

Meanwhile:

I want it too return the values of 7 and 8 and also -6 but I know I don't have the right code to return -6 as of now.

You can translate your English directly into Python:

it will return numbers that are greater than 5 or less than -5

… is:

… element > 5 or element < -5 …

However, there's a way to write this that's simpler, if you understand it:

… abs(element) > 5 …

So, this gets option 0 to work. What about option 1?

One simple way to tell if a number is odd is if number % 2 is non-zero.

So, let's put it all together:

if option == 0:
    return [element for element in nList if abs(element) > 5]
elif option == 1:
    return [element for element in nList if element % 2]
else:
    raise ValueError("I don't know option {}".format(option))

From a comment:

How would I change this to a while loop?

To change a for loop into a while loop, you have to break it into three parts: initialize the loop variable, write a while test, and update the loop variable inside the body. The general translation is this:

for element in iterable:
    spam(element)

it = iterator(iterable)
while True:
    try:
        element = next(it)
    except StopIteration:
        break
    else:
        spam(element)

Ugly, isn't it? But usually, you can come up with something simpler that's specific to your case. For example, if the iterable is a sequence, list a list, you can do this:

index, size = 0, len(sequence)
while index < size:
    spam(sequence[index])
    index += 1

Still not nearly as nice as the for loop, but not nearly as ugly as the generic while.


Finally, just for fun. Everyone knows that function mappings are more Pythonic than elif chains, right? To prove the value of dogmatically following rules like that, let's do it here:

preds = {0: lambda x: abs(x) > 5,
         1: lambda x: x % 2}
def splitList(myList, option):
    return filter(preds[option], myList)
share|improve this answer
1  
May as well add the odd number filter on option == 1 while you're at it? –  Iskar Jarak Oct 8 '13 at 22:04
    
@IskarJarak: Sure, why not. –  abarnert Oct 8 '13 at 22:05
    
@IskarJarak: I keep getting options 0 and 1 mixed up. (This is why we have enums…) Can you check it over and make sure I've got it right now? –  abarnert Oct 8 '13 at 22:06
1  
Yeah, I noticed that and was going to say something, but your last edit before adding the lambda/filter ugliness has it all fixed. –  Iskar Jarak Oct 8 '13 at 22:08
2  
@RyanErickson: I'm not going to do all of your work for you. Especially as a followup to a question that already has an answer that's this long; adding even more to it will just make it less useful for future readers. On top of that, I already explained what was wrong with your version in a comment on the question. If you can't understand that after reading this answer, you're not going to be able to understand the code I'd give you. You may get a passing grade on this assignment by turning in code you don't get, but you're going to fail the class anyway. –  abarnert Oct 8 '13 at 23:41
show 10 more comments

Seems like you should just write two separate functions, since the function you're trying to add options to does rather different things.

Python lets you iterate over lists and other data structures easily:

for element in myList:
    if option == 0:
        if element > 5:
            nList.append(element)
    ....
share|improve this answer
    
How would i switch this to a while loop? @decency –  Ryan Erickson Oct 8 '13 at 23:01
    
@RyanErickson I wouldn't, but you can always create a variable to increment as you iterate over the list in each while loop. –  Chris Arena Oct 8 '13 at 23:51
add comment

Because one-liners are fun:

def splitlist(li, flag):
    return [x for x in li if x%2==1] if flag else [x for x in li if abs(x)>5]

If this is homework, you probably don't want to be turning in this for an answer, but it should give some ideas.

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Other aspects of the question have been ably answered, but there's a rather unpythonic construction in your argument use. Better would be:

def extract_elements(my_list, odd_only):
    """Return select elements from my_list.

    If odd_only is True return the odd elements. 
    If odd_only is False return elements between -5 and 5 inclusive.
    """
    …

There are four significant points demonstrated here:

  1. Names are very important, odd_only is far more descriptive than option, and calling a method splitList when it doesn't split anything is confusing to read.
  2. Don't use arbitrary integers to represent a boolean option when the language has intrinsic booleans.
  3. There is no name for that method that could possibly allow the reader to understand its highly idiosyncratic function (and extract_odd_or_magnitude_of_five is hard to type and still isn't descriptive). That's why there are docstrings, they bind the description of the method very closely to the method definition.
  4. Convention matters. The Style Guide for Python helps others read your code.
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