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I've an oracle table that stores following kind of data in a varchar2 column -

1009-25-7-7-1-7-22-5-7
1009-25-7-7-1-7-22-5-9
1001-2-53
1001-2-53-57
1001-2-53-72
1001-2-53-76
1001-2-53-88
1001-2-53-13
1001-2-53-17
1001-2-53-25

Now my requirement is to sort this data numerically. I've thousands of rows in this column with n level of combination like above. Any idea how I can sort this numerically. Really help any input that I can get, as I'm clueless on this. The number system above is generated programatically such that "number 1 - number 2 - number 3", so I need to sort first based on "number 1", then "number 2" and so on. And the result for above data-set should be -

1001-2-53
1001-2-53-13
1001-2-53-17
1001-2-53-25
1001-2-53-57
1001-2-53-72
1001-2-53-76
1001-2-53-88
1009-25-7-7-1-7-22-5-7
1009-25-7-7-1-7-22-5-9
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1  
You need to define the logic for the ordering before you can implement it. For example, do you order by the first 'element', then the second, etc; is a value with three elements always 'lower' than one with four; and so on. – Alex Poole Oct 8 '13 at 22:18
    
Include a proper description of your table/column. Also, what do you mean by "numerically"? – geomagas Oct 8 '13 at 22:27
    
What happened to your normal ORDER BY clause? – ajmalmhd04 Oct 9 '13 at 3:07
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is pretty brutal, and probably not usable. Looks like a nested table might do what you want with that column. The example below uses some built in xml utilities to break the column apart and re-assemble again:

  • change the column into an xml string with REPLACE and some concatenation
  • build an xmltype out of the xml string using xmlsequence to pull out elements from the xmltype and treat them like rows
  • convert each of these row values using an 8-digit numeric format(expand this mask to the largest width number)
  • reverse the process concatenating the rows back together (sort_string)
  • order based on the padded numbers

I put this together with a bunch of cut and pasting:

http://askankit.blogspot.ca/2009/04/use-xmlagg-in-oracle-to-concat-multiple.html https://forums.oracle.com/message/9408528

CREATE TABLE my_table(mycol varchar2(1024));
insert into my_table values('1009-25-7-7-1-7-22-5-7');
insert into my_table values('1009-25-7-7-1-7-22-5-9');
insert into my_table values('1001-2-53');
insert into my_table values('1001-2-53-57');
insert into my_table values('1001-2-53-72');
insert into my_table values('1001-2-53-76');
insert into my_table values('1001-2-53-88');
insert into my_table values('1001-2-53-13');
insert into my_table values('1001-2-53-17');
insert into my_table values('1001-2-53-25');
insert into my_table values('10');
insert into my_table values('2');

Query:

SELECT mycol, sort_string
  FROM (

    SELECT mycol
          ,SUBSTR(REPLACE(REPLACE(XMLAGG(XMLELEMENT("x", x) ORDER BY seq) 
                                    ,'</x>'
                                   )
                           ,'<x>'
                           ,'|'
                           )
                  ,2 ) AS sort_string

      FROM ( SELECT m.mycol
                   ,TO_CHAR(EXTRACTVALUE(column_value,'inner'), '09999999') AS x
                   ,ROWNUM AS seq
               FROM my_table m
                   ,TABLE(xmlsequence(xmltype(
                      '<outer>' ||
                         '<inner>' || REPLACE(mycol,'-','</inner><inner>') || '</inner>' ||
                      '</outer>'
                    ).EXTRACT('outer/*')))
                      )
      GROUP BY mycol

  ) ORDER BY sort_string

Result:

|                  MYCOL |                                                                               SORT_STRING |
|------------------------|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
|                      2 |                                                                                  00000002 |
|                     10 |                                                                                  00000010 |
|              1001-2-53 |                                                              00001001| 00000002| 00000053 |
|           1001-2-53-13 |                                                    00001001| 00000002| 00000053| 00000013 |
|           1001-2-53-17 |                                                    00001001| 00000002| 00000053| 00000017 |
|           1001-2-53-25 |                                                    00001001| 00000002| 00000053| 00000025 |
|           1001-2-53-57 |                                                    00001001| 00000002| 00000053| 00000057 |
|           1001-2-53-72 |                                                    00001001| 00000002| 00000053| 00000072 |
|           1001-2-53-76 |                                                    00001001| 00000002| 00000053| 00000076 |
|           1001-2-53-88 |                                                    00001001| 00000002| 00000053| 00000088 |
| 1009-25-7-7-1-7-22-5-7 |  00001009| 00000025| 00000007| 00000007| 00000001| 00000007| 00000022| 00000005| 00000007 |
| 1009-25-7-7-1-7-22-5-9 |  00001009| 00000025| 00000007| 00000007| 00000001| 00000007| 00000022| 00000005| 00000009 |
share|improve this answer

Here is an ugly regular expression to convert every 1, 2, and 3 digit number into a 4 digit number by adding leading zeros. If the numbers can be longer than 4 digits you must add more replacements.

select * from (
  select that_column original, regexp_replace(regexp_replace(regexp_replace(replace(that_column,'-','--'),'(^|-)(\d{1})(-|$)','\1000\2\3'),'(^|-)(\d{2})(-|$)','\100\2\3'),'(^|-)(\d{3})(-|$)','\10\2\3') sortable
  from that_table
) order by sortable;

Since oracle has no zero width matches, first convert every '-' to '--' so numbers can be matched as -##- with a fixed number of digits. Thus the innermost function is replace(that_column,'-','--').

After that, in no particular order, convert groups of digits of a chosen size to a larger size by adding leading zeros. Replace '(^|-)(\d{1})(-|$)' with '\1000\2\3' converts 1 digit groups into 4 digit groups by adding 3 leading zeros.

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