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I need to create a function that generates prime numbers between two input numbers. I do this by testing the primality of each number in range. The problem is that the numbers 3, 5, or 7 are never displayed. I'm not sure what's wrong.

This is how I test primality of a number:

bool isPrime(int number){
    using namespace std;
    if((number%2==0) || (number%3==0) || (number%4==0) || (number%5==0) ||
       (number%6==0) || (number%7==0) || (number%8==0) || (number%9==0))
    {
        return false;
    }
    else if ((number/1==number) && (number/number==1))
    {
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this question
10  
I can tell you right off the bat this is not the correct code to find prime numbers – aaronman Oct 9 '13 at 0:04
1  
Your code is almost equivalent to just listing all prime numbers within your range and checking if the input is one of them. Don't be lazy, create an actual primality test, please. Plus, (number/1==number) && (number/number==1) makes no sense. – Matti Virkkunen Oct 9 '13 at 0:04
2  
Easy. Because 3 % 3 is 0, and since you have (number%3==0) in your conditional, the output of that function is false. – Santa Oct 9 '13 at 0:05
    
are you calling isPrime on every number between the two inputted numbers? Even so, isPrime(3) returns false even though 3 is prime... – Calpis Oct 9 '13 at 0:05
2  
isPrime(2) would also return false even though 2 is a prime. So it's not just 3, 5, and 7. – Santa Oct 9 '13 at 0:08

3 is a multiple of 3. 5 is a multiple of 5. 7 is a multiple of 7. You wrote code that returns false for any multiple of 3, 5, or 7, so it can't possibly return true for those numbers. You need to only check for divisibility by primes smaller than the number you're checking.

You also check for divisibility by a lot of unnecessary composite numbers; for example, a number can't be a multiple of 4 without being a multiple of 2, and it can't be a multiple of 6 without being a multiple of 2 and 3. Those checks do nothing except waste time.

Finally, your code is wrong 100% of the time in the long run, because the highest prime it checks is 7. It will say that 169 (13 * 13) is prime because it isn't divisible by any of the numbers you check, but it's clearly composite. For trial division you need to check all of the primes less than or equal to floor(sqrt(n)), either by doing a lot of unneccessary checks against composites, or by building up a list of primes as you go (akin to the Sieve of Eratosthenes, and often called that by CS types, but I don't think it's strictly equivalent).

share|improve this answer
    
Mathematically, you only need to check all the numbers less than the (rounded integer) square root of the number you are checking. If nothing is a multiple prior to that, nothing will be afterwards either. – Zac Howland Oct 9 '13 at 0:10
    
@ZacHowland true, I'll amend. – hobbs Oct 9 '13 at 0:11
    
if it were "wrong 100%" you wouldn't have to qualify it with "in the long run". The code will produce 100% correct results for numbers between 10 and 120, inclusive. – Will Ness Oct 11 '13 at 10:51
    
@WillNess I meant that in a very specific way. Asymptotically it's correct 0% of the time. – hobbs Oct 11 '13 at 14:13

A very simple (and not all that efficient) method:

bool is_prime(int i)
{
    int root = (int)std::sqrt(i);
    bool result = true;
    for (int j = 2; j <= root; ++j)
    {
        if (i % j == 0)
        {
            result = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Come on, don't spoonfeed... – Matti Virkkunen Oct 9 '13 at 0:12
    
@MattiVirkkunen I was feeling somewhat generous ... – Zac Howland Oct 9 '13 at 0:13
    
result=false; break; is bad style. You should return immediately, leaving no room for possible error introduction. – Will Ness Oct 11 '13 at 10:58
    
@WillNess For a simple function like this, that may be acceptable; however, for a larger function having returns scattered throughout the function makes it difficult to refactor, debug, and maintain. – Zac Howland Oct 11 '13 at 14:34

You might want to take a look at this article.

It's a systematic way of finding prime numbers. Use this algorithm to keep finding prime numbers until you reach the upper value of the inputs.

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Look at this line of code:

if((number%2==0) || (number%3==0) || 
   (number%4==0) || (number%5==0) ||
   (number%6==0) || (number%7==0) ||
   (number%8==0) || (number%9==0))
   return false;

Think about what happens if you plug in 2, 3, 5, or 7. In each case, you will find that the number, mod 2, mod 3, mod 5, or mod 7, is indeed zero, so your code will return false. This probably explains why you're getting those numbers not counting as prime.

But now look at the next statement:

else if ((number/1==number) && (number/number==1)){
    return true;
}

In what cases would this be false? Every number divided by one is itself and every number divided by itself is one, so every number passes this test. Therefore, your code will return true on any number, as long as it isn't divisible by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or 9. Try plugging in 11 x 13 = 143. This number isn't prime, but your function will say that it is.

Others have posted other routes you can take to solve the problem, but fundamentally I think the issue is that a number is prime if no numbers other than 1 and itself are divisors. Your function will somehow need to account for this, probably by checking all the numbers below it that aren't one or itself. It's possible to optimize this further, as some answers have proposed, but you should be aware that at a basic level this is what needs to be done.

Hope this helps!

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Or you can use this algorithm:

#include<iostream>
#include<string>
#include<cmath>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int num;
    int count = 0;

    cout << "Enter your range: ";
    cin >> num;

    for(int i = 1; i <= num; i++)
    {
        count = 0;
        for(int j = 2; j <= sqrt(i); j++)
        {
            if(i % j == 0)
            {
                count++;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(count == 0 && i != 1)
            cout << i << "   ";
    }
    cout << endl;   
}
share|improve this answer
    
1. repeatedly calculate sqrt is very bad. 2. using a count is not good either. If an int n >= 2 has a divisor between 2 and sqrt(n) then you can immediately conclude that it's not a prime – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Mar 4 '14 at 8:03

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