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I have a fluid width div (width: 100%) that contains a fluid width unordered list (width: 30%) and a fluid width block of content (width: 70%) positioned to the right of it. As the block of content exceeds the height of the unordered list I would like each list item's height to increase to fill the containers height. Obviously an li height of 25% isn't going to work but that is what I'm looking for. I'm stuck. Any suggestions?

<div id="container">
    <ul id="tabs">
        <li>Item 1</li>
        <li>Item 2</li>
        <li>Item 3</li>
        <li>Item 4</li>
    </ul>
    <div id="content">
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...</p>
    </div>
</div>
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can you make a fiddle ? –  Tushar Gupta Oct 9 '13 at 0:44
1  
This is not possible with just CSS if the number of list items is dynamic, you'll need some extra JS to cover this. –  Niels Keurentjes Oct 9 '13 at 0:44
    
It is a fixed number of list items. –  Justin Oct 11 '13 at 1:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you are willing to add an extra container to your html:

<div id="container">
    <div id="tabs-wrapper">
        <ul id="tabs">
            <li>Item 1</li>
            <li>Item 2</li>
            <li>Item 3</li>
            <li>Item 4</li>
        </ul>
    </div>
    <div id="content">
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...</p>
    </div>
</div>

Then you can use the magic of display: table; and display: table-row; to size your li elements to fit with pure css.

I used position: absolute; around the tabs-wrapper element and the 'stretch' method of declaring the extents of each side to be where I want them, to get it to fill the height of the main container.

#container {
    position: relative;
}
#tabs-wrapper, #content {
    display: inline-block;
}
#tabs-wrapper {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 70%;
    bottom: 0;
}
#tabs {
    display: table;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
}
#tabs li {
    display: table-row;
}
#content {
    width: 70%;
    margin-left: 30%;
}

I did this pretty quick so I'm sure it could be done a bit more efficiently. Heck, you might even be able to get rid of that extra container element if you play around with it enough, who knows.

Here's the fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/Dx4L8/

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Thank you, I really like this pure css solution. Ultimately I need each list item's text to be vertically centered. Is there any other way to do this other than enclose the link text in a span element and set it to display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; ? –  Justin Oct 11 '13 at 1:52
    
Hmm, I can't think of any other way. Vertical alignment is a tricky thing for percentage / dynamically sized elements. –  Blake Mann Oct 11 '13 at 2:05
    
Thanks Blake. I appreciate the help. –  Justin Oct 11 '13 at 2:14

You may try this by adding a static background to your unordered list (width: 30%) like this:

#your_tab_id_here:before {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  width:30%;
  position: fixed;
  bottom: 0;
  top: 0;
  z-index: -9999;
  background-color: #cccccc; // same with the background of your tabs

}

Also, for the footer, with this kind of approach, just try to make it sticky at the bottom :) Hope, this gives you the idea..

See my JSFiddle Here

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With jQuery:

var adjustHeight;

$(document).ready(function() {
    var $tabs = $('#tabs');
    var $content = $('#content');

    adjustHeight = function() {
        var tabsH = $tabs.height();
        var contentH = $content.height();
        if(contentH > tabsH) {
            $tabs.height(contentH); //set height if greater than tabs
        } else {
            $content.attr('height', ''); //remove height if one has been set
        }
    }

    adjustHeight();

    // If the #content height changes, you need to rerun adjustHeight()
});

This code will run when the page first loads. If the #content height changes after the page load (if content is getting changed via ajax, for instance), then you'll need to set up a callback to run adjustHeight().

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