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function myclass()
{
    var pri_var;
    this.pub_var;
    this.pub_func = function(which_object)
    {
        pri_var = which_object;
        this.pub_var = which_object + " pub";
    }
    this.pub_func1 = function()
    {
        console.log(this);
        alert(this.pub_var);
        alert(pri_var);
    }
}

instance1 = new myclass();
instance2 = new myclass();
instance1.pub_func("first");
instance2.pub_func("second");
//instance1.pub_func1();
//instance2.pub_func1();
function callCallback(callback1, callback2){
callback1("first");
callback2("second");
}
callCallback(instance1.pub_func1, instance2.pub_func1);

private varaibleis correctly noted, but public is undefined, as this points to window and not to myclass instance.

What is the solution for accessing public variable in callbacks defined inside class?

possible answer

function myclass()
{
    var pri_var;
    this.pub_var;
    var that = this;
    this.pub_func = function(which_object)
    {
        pri_var = which_object;
        that.pub_var = which_object + " pub";
    }
    this.pub_func1 = function()
    {
        console.log(this);
        alert(that.pub_var);
        alert(pri_var);
    }
}

instance1 = new myclass();
instance2 = new myclass();
instance1.pub_func("first");
instance2.pub_func("second");
//instance1.pub_func1();
//instance2.pub_func1();
function callCallback(callback1, callback2){
callback1("first");
callback2("second");
}
callCallback(instance1.pub_func1, instance2.pub_func1);
share|improve this question
    
Fiddled. – Ryan Miller Oct 9 '13 at 5:51
1  
Have a look at developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… to learn how this works. – Felix Kling Oct 9 '13 at 5:52
    
You can use instance1.pub_func1.call(instance1) but honestly, whatever you're thinking on doing, it probably can be done a better way than this. – Joe Simmons Oct 9 '13 at 5:52
    
@FelixKling I used a "var that = this;" and then "that" to access public vars, is this the correct way to go? – user494461 Oct 9 '13 at 5:54
    
That's the most common way. I use it in my library script. It's a good way to go. – Joe Simmons Oct 9 '13 at 5:59

In ECMAScript, this is not "context", it is a property of an execution context that is usually set by how the function is called, or in ES5 by using bind. I'll ignore bind in this answer since you aren't using it.

When you do:

callCallback(instance1.pub_func1, ...);

what is passed to callCallback is a reference to the function, so when it's called its this is not set. In ES3 and ES5 non–strict mode, if this isn't set in the call, it is set to the global object (window in a browser).

So in pub_func1 function:

console.log(this);

will return the global object and in strict mode it will return undefined. There are many articles on the web explaining how this works in ECMAScript, read a few as most aren't very good on their own, then ask further questions here if needed.

share|improve this answer
    
He already stated that he knows this is the global object. Your answer is useless, no offense. – Joe Simmons Oct 9 '13 at 6:00
    
Fair enough, the OP seems to have worked out "that". ;-) – RobG Oct 9 '13 at 8:47

Your function

this.pub_func1 = function()
{
    console.log(this);
    alert(this.pub_var);
    alert(pri_var);
}

is being asked to accept a parameter on this call:

callCallback(instance1.pub_func1, instance2.pub_func1);

function callCallback(callback1, callback2){
   callback1("first");
   callback2("second");
}

Ensure that your functions are set up to accept variables passed to them, and RobG's comments regarding context are key as well. However, this issue is likely due to tangled syntax.

share|improve this answer

this does not reference the same thing in different functions. Store a reference to myclass, then use it in the public functions.

function myclass()
{
    var pri_var;
    var that = this;
    this.pub_func = function(which_object)
    {
        pri_var = which_object;
        that.pub_var = which_object + " pub";
    }
    this.pub_func1 = function()
    {
        console.log(that);
        alert(that.pub_var);
        alert(pri_var);
    }
}

instance1 = new myclass();
instance2 = new myclass();
instance1.pub_func("first");
instance2.pub_func("second");
//instance1.pub_func1();
//instance2.pub_func1();
function callCallback(callback1, callback2){
callback1("first");
callback2("second");
}
callCallback(instance1.pub_func1, instance2.pub_func1);
share|improve this answer

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