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I have a Presenter that takes a Service and a View Contract as parameters in its constructor:

public FooPresenter : IFooPresenter {
    private IFooView view;
    private readonly IFooService service;

    public FooPresenter(IFooView view, IFooService service) {
        this.view = view;
        this.service = service;
    }
}

I resolve my service with Autofac:

private ContainerProvider BuildDependencies() {
    var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
    builder.Register<FooService>().As<IFooService>().FactoryScoped();  

    return new ContainerProvider(builder.Build());  
}

In my ASPX page (View implementation):

public partial class Foo : Page, IFooView {
    private FooPresenter presenter;

    public Foo() {
        // this is straightforward but not really ideal
        // (IoCResolve is a holder for how I hit the container in global.asax)
        this.presenter = new FooPresenter(this, IoCResolve<IFooService>());

        // I would rather have an interface IFooPresenter so I can do
        this.presenter = IoCResolve<IFooPresenter>();
        // this allows me to add more services as needed without having to 
        // come back and manually update this constructor call here
    }
}

The issue is FooPresenter's constructor expects the specific Page, not for the container to create a new one.

Can I supply a specific instance of the view, the current page, to the container for just this resolution? Does that make sense to do, or should I do this another way?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The way to solve passing what I like to call data parameters when resolving dependencies in Autofac is by using generated factories.

(Update: this question discusses the same problem and my article shows how you can avoid large amounts of factory delegates).

The solution to your problem will look something like this:

First, declare a factory delegate thath only accepts the data parameters:

public delegate IFooPresenter FooPresenterFactory(IFooView view);

Your presenter goes unchanged:

public FooPresenter : IFooPresenter {
    private IFooView view;
    private readonly IFooService service;

    public FooPresenter(IFooView view, IFooService service) {
        this.view = view;
        this.service = service;
    }
}

Next the Autofac container setup:

var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
builder.Register<FooService>().As<IFooService>().FactoryScoped();  
builder.Register<FooPresenter>().As<IFooPresenter>().FactoryScoped();  
builder.RegisterGeneratedFactory<FooPresenterFactory>();

Now in your page you can in two lines of code resolve the presenter by first getting the factory and then calling the factory to do the resolution for you:

public partial class Foo : Page, IFooView {
    private FooPresenter presenter;

    public Foo() {
        var factory = IoCResolve<FooPresenterFactory>();
        this.presenter = factory(this);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent solution. Thanks for pointing it out. I hadn't really grasped generated factories until now. –  Bryan Watts Dec 18 '09 at 8:03
    
I am working out how to do this at an abstract level. My current framework allows views to be decorated with [Presenter(typeof(FooPresenter))] (so the boilerplate resolution code is eliminated). With generated factories, I won't know which specific factory type to resolve without more metadata. I will probably use builder.RegisterGeneratedFactory<Func<TView, TPresenter>>(); behind an extension method RegisterPresenter<T> which discovers the view type via reflection. Anyways, thanks for the inspiration! –  Bryan Watts Dec 18 '09 at 8:24
    
You could also try out my generic factory sample (link to the article in my sample). You would only have to register one generic factory that can build any presenter dynamically. It should even be possible to couple that with your Presenter attribute minimizing both boilerplate resolution code AND boilerplate container setup :) –  Peter Lillevold Dec 18 '09 at 8:43
    
+1 This looks clean and straightforward, I will check it out later and see how it goes. Thanks for the reply. –  blu Dec 18 '09 at 14:41
    
I read through your article. I wanted to verify this delegate signature: public delegate T ServiceFactory() where T:class;. T needs to be declared somewhere, which means it should be ServiceFactory<T>(). This would change CustomerController's constructor to use ServiceFactory<CustomerService> as the parameter type. Does that sound right? –  Bryan Watts Dec 18 '09 at 14:49

I actually solved this exact problem and built a framework around it. I used Autofac parameters to pass existing views to the presenter resolution call.

First, I defined a custom resolution interface derived from Autofac's:

public interface IMvpContext : IContext
{
    T View<T>();
}

which allowed me to register a presenter which resolves the view:

builder.RegisterPresenter(c => new FooPresenter(
    c.View<IFooView>(),
    c.Resolve<IFooService>()));

using an extension method which wraps Autofac's IContext in an implementation of IMvpContext:

public static IConcreteRegistrar RegisterPresenter<T>(
    this ContainerBuilder builder,
    Func<IMvpContext, T> creator)
{
    return builder
        .Register((context, parameters) => creator(new MvpContext(context, parameters)))
        .FactoryScoped();
}

I defined a parameter type representing the view parameter:

public class MvpViewParameter : NamedParameter
{
    public static readonly string ParameterName = typeof(MvpViewParameter).AssemblyQualifiedName;

    public MvpViewParameter(object view) : base(ParameterName, view)
    {}
}

It uses its own assembly-qualified type name as the parameter name. This has a very low likelihood of conflicting with legitimate parameters.

MvpContext passes all standard resolution calls to the base context. For the view, it resolves the parameter with the well-known name:

public sealed class MvpContext : IMvpContext
{
    private IContext _context;
    private IEnumerable<Parameter> _resolutionParameters;

    public MvpContext(IContext context, IEnumerable<Parameter> resolutionParameters)
    {
        _context = context;
        _resolutionParameters = resolutionParameters;
    }

    #region IContext

    // Pass through all calls to _context

    #endregion

    #region IMvpContext

    public T View<T>()
    {
        return _resolutionParameters.Named<T>(MvpViewParameter.ParameterName);
    }
    #endregion
}

The call to resolve the presenter provides the view parameter:

public partial class Foo : Page, IFooView
{
    private readonly FooPresenter presenter;

    public Foo()
    {
        this.presenter = IoCResolve<IFooPresenter>(new MvpViewParameter(this));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is unnecessarily complex. Do this using the built-in generated factory stuff and you can drop the whole MvpContext parameter thing. –  Peter Lillevold Dec 18 '09 at 7:28
    
(See the comments on @Peter's answer for further discussion of this approach.) –  Bryan Watts Dec 22 '09 at 15:40

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