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how to count the number of objects created in c++

pls explain with a simple example

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Are you counting only objects created using dynamic allocation or objects with automatic storage (such as the stack)? –  Thomas Matthews Dec 18 '09 at 18:05

5 Answers 5

Create template class with a static counter.

Each object in your application would then extend this template class.

When constructor is called increment static count (static variable is per class - shared by all objects of that class).

For example see Object Counter using Curiously recurring template pattern:

template <typename T>
struct counter
{
    counter()
    {
        objects_created++;
        objects_alive++;
    }

    virtual ~counter()
    {
        --objects_alive;
    }
    static int objects_created;
    static int objects_alive;
};
template <typename T> int counter<T>::objects_created( 0 );
template <typename T> int counter<T>::objects_alive( 0 );

class X : counter<X>
{
    // ...
};

class Y : counter<Y>
{
    // ...
};

Usage for completeness:

int main()
{
    X x1;

    {
        X x2;
        X x3;
        X x4;
        X x5;
        Y y1;
        Y y2;
    }   // objects gone

    Y y3;

    cout << "created: "
         << " X:" << counter<X>::object_created
         << " Y:" << counter<Y>::object_created
         << endl;

    cout << "alive: "
         << " X:" << counter<X>::object_alive
         << " Y:" << counter<Y>::object_alive
         << endl;
}

Output:

created:  X:5 Y:3
alive:  X:1 Y:1
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Hi. Nice approach. I never knew about that. Thanks! –  bdhar Dec 18 '09 at 6:19
    
Some time ago I was doing some static polymorphism and bumped to this example, I really like it, and static polymorphism is cool as well ... –  stefanB Dec 18 '09 at 6:21
    
Nice solution, I have a doubt though.. is it really necessary to make the destructor virtual in the class template when using CRTP? I am just worried about the slight size overhead caused by the v-tables.. –  Naveen Dec 18 '09 at 6:39
    
works without virtual destructor as well. –  stefanB Dec 18 '09 at 6:46
2  
how does this handle. X x2; X x3 = x2; –  Jagannath Dec 18 '09 at 8:27
template <class T>
class Counter
{
  private:
      static int count;
  public:
    Counter()
    {
       count++;
    }  
    Counter(const Counter &c)
    {
       count++;
    }   
    ~Counter()
    {
       count--;
    }    
    static int GetCount() {

         return count;
    }
}

template<class T> 
int Counter<T>::count = 0; 



class MyClass : private Counter<MyClass>
{
   public:
      using Counter<MyClass>::GetCount;
}

This technique is called CRTP

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2  
@stefanB, This is the correct approach. You need to have copy constructor in Counter. –  Jagannath Dec 18 '09 at 8:35
1  
+1, stefanB's approach does not handle 'X x2; X x3 = x2;'. But you can't initialize count like that, since it's not const. –  Keats Dec 30 '09 at 18:52
    
ya u r correct ...i hv to define it outsied class. –  Ashish Dec 7 '10 at 21:34

Number of objects for what? If you want to count the number of objects of a specific class, you can use a static counter. Something like below.. Increment counter on creation and decrement while destruction..

class A
{
  public:
    static int counter;
    A()
    {
      counter ++;
    }
    virtual ~A()
    {
      counter --;
    }
};

int A :: counter = 0;
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How do you keep track if the object is created using malloc? –  Kranthi Kumar Apr 14 '13 at 18:04

You have to overload the new and delete operators to count memory allocations.

void * operator new (size_t size)
{
    void * p = malloc (size);
    num_allocations++;
    return p;
}

void operator delete (void * p)
{
    num_deletions++;
    free (p);
}
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I think new [] and delete [] also have to be overloaded if you want to track objects on heap . –  Ashish Dec 18 '09 at 8:11
    
Yes you are correct Mac. I was just trying to get him started. You need to overload every variation of new that you are using. –  DevDevDev Dec 19 '09 at 0:25
    
doesnt that break the code? delete should call destructor first; –  NoSenseEtAl Sep 14 '11 at 12:22

You could create a counter variable into the public: of your class (assuming here you're talking about counting objects from a class you created)

class Widget {
public:
    Widget() { ++count; }
    Widget(const Widget&) { ++count; }
    ~Widget() { --count; }

    static size_t howMany()
    { return count; }

private:
    static size_t count;
};
// obligatory definition of count. This
// goes in an implementation file
size_t Widget::count = 0;

Taken from ddj.com

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you should read the whole article from scott meyers to see that this solutions is not the best. At the end of the article he describes the template approach mentioned in the other posts. –  Holger Kretzschmar Dec 18 '09 at 9:49

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