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I've read lot of stuff about OpenGL and I've got some questions about "architecture".

  1. OpenGL have Buffers, so, it is usefull to store geometry's data in a class? I can edit in live OpenGL buffers, right?
  2. OpenGL index buffers can handle GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT and GL_UNSIGNED_INT, in my class how can I manage this different types? Did I need to create one vector of unsigned int, one vector of short, …?
  3. Is it useful to manage unsigned int, unsigned byte and unsigned short for indices? I'm asking that because storing just unsigned short would be less painfull and could allow small and big models.
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Technically the correct term is "dessign" –  Manu343726 Oct 9 '13 at 8:25
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I would advice you to fully learn and understand C++ before you start using something as advanced as OpenGL. –  Vallentin Oct 9 '13 at 15:23
    
Also, you almost never want to use unsigned byte to store indices. Whether to use unsigned int or unsigned short depends on whether you can fit everything into unsigned shorts. –  fintelia Oct 9 '13 at 19:39
    
Use the smallest type possible, but avoid GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, it is not a hardware-friendly index type. Using smaller types reduces the storage / bus traffic which is a win-win, so long as the hardware supports the type (16-/32-bit types are universally supported on desktop GPUs). –  Andon M. Coleman Oct 9 '13 at 20:02
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2 Answers

With regards to your questions:

  1. OpenGL have Buffers, so, it is usefull to store geometry's data in a class? I can edit in live OpenGL buffers, right?

This depends on how often you intend to update the data, and the type of GPU you're using. If you're using a discrete "desktop" GPU (e.g., NVIDIA or ATI/AMD), OpenGL buffers are allocated on the graphics card's memory, and editing (by calling glMapBuffer or vairants) a buffer usually requires either copying the data from the GPU back to the CPU's memory, or keeping a "shadow copy" of your data in the CPU which is sent to the GPU after editing. Either way, you will likely incur a delay by editing the data in the buffer.

An alternative — and usually better — way to edit the data is to replace a portion of the buffer using glBufferSubData, which may help reduce the effects of mapping and unmapping the buffer for interactive editing. This call requires an array of data in CPU memory which will be copied to the GPU to replace the data in the buffer. The amount of data you can send with glBufferSubData must be less than the size of the original buffer.

With respect to keeping data in a class, if you'll be changing the data often, then your best approach is probably to keep a local copy, and then glBufferSubData to send it to the GPU.

  1. OpenGL index buffers can handle GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT and GL_UNSIGNED_INT, in my class how can I manage this different types? Did I need to create one vector of unsigned int, one vector of short, …?

No, you only need one buffer of the most appropriate type based on how many vertices you need to index. For example, you can only access 256 vertices using GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE indices.

  1. Is it useful to manage unsigned int, unsigned byte and unsigned short for indices? I'm asking that because storing just unsigned short would be less painfull and could allow small and big models.

Once again, the data type you use for indices is really only important for how many vertices you want to access, so if GLushort is the best storage format, go for it.

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+1: But with respect to using the "most appropriate type" based on the number of vertices, I should add that desktop GPUs are not capable of using an 8-bit index for the post-T&L cache (they only support 16/32-bit). What this usually winds up meaning if you use an 8-bit element array is that the driver will pad the elements out to 16-bit at run-time, and you do not save any memory in the long-run and only add extra work for the driver. In D3D, 8-bit indices are not even supported and I think on embedded graphics devices whether the hardware supports them or not is much more of a grey area. –  Andon M. Coleman Oct 9 '13 at 19:58
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What you are asking is just a matter of design choise. It would be best to go for an implementation that fits your needs and change that only when you can't handle a feature. At this point you will have something working and it will be easier to make changes to support new stuff. I would suggest to use unsigned int as indices and the index buffers as a std::vector<unsigned int> directly in memory for easier use.

Razvan.

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