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In order to use the view-models written at server-side at client-side, I am using knockoutjs mapping plugin. But I didn't wanted to write any js code in my view. For this reason, as such I don't have access to Model, I am now getting the model via ajax call with no values in the properties in the code below. This code is written in a external js file:

var Person = function () {
    var self = this;


    self.SetupKOBindings = function (flagkey) {
        var source = null;
        if (flagkey.val() === "True") {
            this.GetViewModelFromServer = function () {
                $.ajax(
                    {
                        url: "/Person/LoadData",
                        type: "GET",
                        async: false
                    }).
                success(function (data) {
                    if (data !== null && data !== undefined) {
                        source = data;
                        flagkey.val("false");
                    }
                });
            }();
            return ko.mapping.fromJS(source);
        }
        return null;
    };

    self.ViewModel = function (flagkey) {
        this.model = self.SetupKOBindings(flagkey);

        this.model.FullName = ko.computed(function () {
            return this.model.FirstName() + " " + this.model.LastName();
        });

        this.model.ShouldShowFullName = ko.computed(function () {
            return (this.model.FirstName() === null || this.model.LastName() === null) ? false : true;
        });

        this.model.Save = function () {
            if ($(form).valid()) {
                $.ajax(
               {
                   url: "/Person/Index",
                   type: "POST",
                   contentType: "application/json",
                   data: ko.mapping.toJSON(model),
                   async: true
               }).
           success(function (data) {
               ko.mapping.fromJS(model, data);
           });
            }
        }

        return this.model;
    };

    self.ApplyKOBindings = function (vm) {
        ko.applyBindings(vm);
    };

    return this;
};

$(function () {
    var PersonPage = Person();
    var viewModel = PersonPage.ViewModel($('#GetViewModelFromServer'));
    if (viewModel !== null) PersonPage.ApplyKOBindings(viewModel);
});

The problem I faced with this approach was everytime I did a post action, when the page loads, the same ajax request was fired to get the viewmodels from server and the same code runs which then binds the form with vm's properties which are empty.

To avoid this, I am using a hidden control's value as a flag to whether convert the server-side viewmodel to js object or not. So, On the first call, I set the value of flag to false.

Now to get the validation messages mentioned using data annotations, I have made the form as partial view and it uses ajax call to replace the content a div with id as Sample. The client-side validation using unobtrusive-validation and server-side validations works very well and also the knockout bindings.

Controller Code:

 [HttpPost]
        public ActionResult Index(PersonViewModel viewModel)
        {
            if (viewModel.Age < 10)
            {
                ModelState.AddModelError("Age", "bal bla bla");
            }
            if (ModelState.IsValid)
            {
                return PartialView("_Form", viewModel);
            }
            else
            {
                viewModel.GetViewModelFromServer = false;
                return PartialView("_Form", viewModel);
            }

        }

Index View:

<div id="sample">
    @Html.Partial("_Form")
</div>

Partial View:

@model MVCKOPractise.Models.PersonViewModel
<fieldset>
    <legend>PeopleViewModel</legend>

        @using (Ajax.BeginForm("Index", "Person", new AjaxOptions() { InsertionMode = InsertionMode.Replace, HttpMethod = "POST", UpdateTargetId = "sample" }))
        {
            <div>
                First Name:
            @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.FirstName, new { data_bind = "value: FirstName,valueUpdate:['afterkeydown','propertychange','input']" })<br />
                @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.FirstName)
            </div>
            <div>
                Last Name:
                    @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.LastName, new { data_bind = "value: LastName,valueUpdate:['afterkeydown','propertychange','input']" })<br />
                @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.LastName)
            </div>
            <div data-bind="visible: ShouldShowFullName">
                Full Name:
                   <div data-bind="text: FullName"></div>
            </div>
            <div>
                Address:
                    @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Address, new { data_bind = "value: Address" })<br />
                @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Address)
            </div>
            <div>
                Age:
                    @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Age, new { data_bind = "value: Age" })<br />
                @Html.ValidationMessage("Age")
            </div>
            @Html.HiddenFor(model => model.GetViewModelFromServer)
            <input type="submit" value="Save" />
        }
</fieldset>

Although the above little sample works for me but I would like to know is this a good way to proceed to

  • Not to write js code in view and use ajax call to create a copy of viewmodel at client, use data- attributes to access any server-side stuff in javascript like I answered this.
  • Using the same validation written using data-annotations at server-side for the views. I know there is a knockout-validation and jquery-validation plugin available. But as mvc data-annotations convert validations to data- attributes which is then read by jquery.
share|improve this question
    
Don't include the jquery validation bundle in the layout page, set enableunobtrusivevalidation="false" in web config. –  Vinay Pratap Singh Oct 9 '13 at 9:22
    
@Rex why should I do this? I need jquery validation and at the moment, I have no issues with validation if I follow the above approach. –  SiddharthP Oct 9 '13 at 9:23

1 Answer 1

I think I understand what you're trying to achieve and have done something similar in the past.

First off, I'm not sure where your model data is coming from - obviously server side but is this always a blank viewmodel? Personally I have implemented something along these lines to retrieve server side data:

In the controller:

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult MyAction(int id)
{
    Return View();
}

[HttpGet]
public JsonResult MyActionData(int id)
{
    return Json(Something.GetMyData(id) ?? new MyViewModel(), AllowGet);
}

That allows me to retrieve the data for the page as I perhaps normally would with a standard MVC request but allow it to be request in JSON. This way I'd get either the data for whatever I'm querying or I get a blank view model.

You can then add a standard post action with the viewmodel as the parameter without worrying about anything special for the ajax side of things.

Secondly, to handle server side only validation (I'm assuming here that you've got client side stuff working fine but there are more complex rules on the server side which require a post back) I actually started returning the validation data in the ModelState back to the client.

Not sure what the best transit for that would be in your scenario (dedicated post method for validation or a view model wrapper with validation data perhaps) but either way the validation object itself provides the field name that has failed validation and the relevant message to be displayed.

Using that data you could create a custom knockout mapping handler that takes the validation data and calculates it back to validation properties on your model (bearing in mind the field names map directly to the object structure in question) or you could have a jQuery handler that loops through the results looking for the fields with the relevant names and adds the validation classes on the fly.

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