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I am trying to get my head round angularjs at the moment. I am currently looking at services I am also using typescript for code.

Now from samples on the web I have seen that people use something like below for a service in typescript.

class Service
{
    constructor( private $http: ng.IHttpService )
    {
    }

    public MyMethod()
    {
        this.$http.get( "/" )
            .success( null )
            .error( null );
    }
}

Now if this is minified I would lose $http from the constructor and angular requires the variable names. So I checked around and found I can use $inject instead of the constructor but this also would get the same minification problem.

How are people dealing with minification and angular in a typescript context? I am struggling to find some solid docs on how this should be handled. To me this seems odd to have these problems in a modern api so I must be missing something somewhere.

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Just using the $inject syntax. e.g. :

class Service
{
    static $inject = ['$http'];    
    constructor( private $http: ng.IHttpService )
    {
    }

    public MyMethod()
    {
        this.$http.get( "/" )
            .success( null )
            .error( null );
    }
}

PS: I did a detailed video on the subject : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdtVn_8K17E&hd=1

share|improve this answer
    
But this way, each Service instance gets its own $http reference. In vanilla JavaScript, the angular.factory method is commonly used to access such dependencies in a closure. What best practices would you suggest to achieve this in Typescript? – mhelvens Jun 25 '14 at 16:59
    
Services are singletons. There will be only one instance – basarat Jun 25 '14 at 22:15
    
Javascript doesn't know about classes (or singletons), and so neither does AngularJS. Services can be anything. I've been offering instantiable 'classes' as services for ages. – mhelvens Jun 26 '14 at 9:55
1  
Yes, but AngularJS will do the instantiating and inject the same instance wherever it is requested. – threed Apr 6 '15 at 18:40

Currently the official TypeScript compiler still does not emit interface metadata that could be used at runtime for a DI system. There is an issue about the Emitter extensibility here. In the meantime I have created a sample project (along with a customized version of the TS compiler that emits interface metadata) of an AngularJS 1.3 application that provides Decorators to register components in the application module and inject dependencies using class metadata at runtime. You can give a look here.

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