Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

On a project I'm working on we have some old dependencies that define their own spring beans but need to be initialized from the main application. These beans are all constructed using spring profiles, i.e. "default" for production code and "test" for test code. We want to move away from using spring profiles, instead simply using @import to explicitly wire up our context.

The idea is to encapsulate all these old dependencies so that no other components need to care about spring profiles. Thus, from a test`s point of view, the application context setup can be described as follows:

@ContextConfiguration(classes = {TestContext.class})
@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
public class MyTest { 
  //tests
}

TestContext further directs to two classes, one of which encapsulates the old dependencies:

@Configuration
@Import(value = {OldComponents.class, NewComponents.class})
public class TestContext {
  //common spring context
}

To encapsulate the old components` need for profiles, the OldComponents.class looks as follows:

@Configuration
@Import(value = {OldContext1.class, OldContext2.class})
public class OldComponents {

  static {
    System.setProperty("spring.profiles.active", "test");
  }

}

The problem here is that the static block does not appear to be executed in time. When running mvn clean install, the test gets an IllegalStateException because the ApplicationContext could not be loaded. I have verified that the static block gets executed, but it would appear that OldContext1 and OldContext2 (which are profile dependent) are already loaded at this time, which means it is too late.

The frustrating thing is that IntelliJ runs the tests just fine this way. Maven, however, does not. Is there a way to force these profiles while keeping it encapsulated? I've tried creating an intermediary context class, but it didn't solve the problem.

If we use the annotation @ActiveProfiles on the test class, it runs just fine but this kind of defeats the purpose. Naturally, we want to achieve the same in production and this means that if we cannot encapsulate the need for profiles, it needs to be configured in the web.xml.

share|improve this question
    
Is a web application? if yes you can set the environment in web.xml –  gerardribas Oct 9 '13 at 12:21
    
Yes it is a web application. What we`re trying to accomplish is not having to set it in the web.xml though, instead we want to encapsulate the profiling to the specific context classes. –  Jarle Svendsrud Oct 9 '13 at 12:42

2 Answers 2

If your configuration classes inherits of AbstractApplicationContext you can call:

getEnvironment().setActiveProfiles("your_profile");

For example:

public class TestContext extends AnnotationConfigWebApplicationContext {

      public TestContext () {
            getEnvironment().setActiveProfiles("test");
            refresh();
      }

}

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately it did not. It would appear that maven insists on completely loading and evaluating the contexts prior to java code execution. –  Jarle Svendsrud Oct 10 '13 at 6:23

It definietly seems that OldContext1 and OldContext2 are being class-loaded and initialized before the static block in OldComponents is executed.

Whilst I can't explain why there is a difference between your IDE and Maven (to do so would require some in-depth knowledge of some, if not all all, of : spring 3.x context initialization, maven surefire plugin, SpringJunit4ClassRunner and the internal IntelliJ test runner), can I recommend to try this?

@Configuration
@Import(value = {UseTestProfile.class, OldContext1.class, OldContext2.class})
public class OldComponents {
    // moved the System.setProperty call to UseTestProfile.class
}

and

@Configuration
public class UseTestProfile {
    static {
        System.setProperty("spring.profiles.active", "test");
    }
}

If I am understanding your problem correctly, class UseTestProfile should be loaded first (you might want to investigate a way to guarantee this?) and the other two classes in the import list should have the system setting they need to initialize properly.

Hope this helps...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply! This was suggested by a colleague a few hours ago. Unfortunately, it didn`t work. His line of reasoning was exactly like yours. –  Jarle Svendsrud Oct 10 '13 at 10:42
    
Sounds like you have some smart colleagues ;) What didn't work? Was the ordering of class loading of the imports non-consistent? –  vikingsteve Oct 10 '13 at 18:19
    
All I know is that it didn´t work. Im unsure about why specifically maven chooses to do what it does, but its evident that it loads and evaluates everything before executing any java code. In this case, its a pity. I had to timebox the project so unless something comes up here on SO, its unlikely that I will be able to find a solution. –  Jarle Svendsrud Oct 14 '13 at 10:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.