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I am aware that I can initialize a structure in C99 with designated initializer, like this:

typedef struct
{

    char a;
    char b;
    int c;

} MyStruct;

MyStruct s = {.a = 1, .b = 2, .c = 3};

(that code isn't working in my c++ compiler, but (russian) wikipedia says it should)

But for some weird reason code like this will also compile (and work as expected):

typedef struct
{

    char a;
    char b;
    int c;

} MyStruct;



MyStruct arr[5];

int main(void)
{

    arr[0] = (MyStruct){.a = 1, .b = 2, .c = 0x332211};
}

I supposed that initialization should work only when object is created, not afterwards.

Is it behavior like this normal or is it some kind of compiler quirk? Should it work in C++? What is exactly is this thing in curly braces? Some kind of temporary unnamed structure? I'm using Keil uVision 4 (and designated initializer is not working in c++ mode).

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1  
What's your compiler? gcc? –  Yu Hao Oct 9 '13 at 12:39
1  
Please add the link were Wikipedia says it should. Also, are you really asking about two languages (C and C++)? –  Daniel Daranas Oct 9 '13 at 12:39
    
@YuHao my compiler is Keil uVision (as i already wrote above) –  Amomum Oct 9 '13 at 12:42
2  
These are designated initializers combined with a compound literal. It's valid in C, not C++. LINK –  jrok Oct 9 '13 at 12:43
1  
@Amomum: I can't read the Russian, but I don't see any examples of designated initialisers on that page. The English version correctly mentions them as a C construct that doesn't exist in C++. –  Mike Seymour Oct 9 '13 at 12:50
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Designated initialisers are a C construct, they're not part of C++. So the C++ compiler is correct in rejecting the code, and should do so in both cases.

The second construct is a "compound literal," again a C feature which is not part of C++. So the C++ compiler should reject that, while a C99 (or newer) compiler should accept both snippets.

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Designated Initializer(in the first example) and Compound Literals(in the second example), are both introduced in C99, C++ doesn't support them yet.

However, some compiler may support these features in C++ as an extension. For instance, gcc supports Compound Literals in C++ but not Designated Initializer. It seems that your compiler does the same.

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Designated Initializers are a C99 feature but it seems like clang and gcc support them in C++ as an extension although the gcc doc claims otherwise. If I build this with clang using the -pedantic flag it says:

warning: designated initializers are a C99 feature [-Wc99-extensions]

and gcc warns:

 warning: ISO C++ does not allow C99 designated initializers [-Wpedantic]

In C++ we have constructors which will allow you to initialize a struct in a cleaner manner.

The second example uses Compound Literals and this is also a C99 feature that is supported as an extension.

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