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How can I highlight all repeated text by double clicking on a word in Notepad?

I want Notepad to act like notepad++ in highlighting text when I select a word repeated inside the content.

I am familiar with some pInvoke materials and concepts. My C# project handles all processes needed for getting Notepad instances, handles etc. But I couldn't figure out how to send back color to notepad edit control?

What I need is your advice and road-map for the matter. Which subject should I cover to achieve this?

Thanks in advance.

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What makes you think you can magically make notepad do this? –  Marc Gravell Oct 9 '13 at 13:31
    
In fact, notepad is just an example, I have another app to which I need to apply this solution. If I manage this in Notepad, I can do it everywhere having edit control outside from my c# app. –  T.Y. Kucuk Oct 9 '13 at 14:25
    
I don't understand how people downvoted the issue. Is it really nonsense? –  T.Y. Kucuk Oct 9 '13 at 15:46
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Well, the first thing to ask is: do you have any reason to think that this is possible? Have you seen this done before? Not everything is possible, or at least: if it is possible, it will have to be done using a ton of hacks upon hacks upon hacks and will be massively brittle, and it is unlikely that it will have a simple answer –  Marc Gravell Oct 9 '13 at 15:49

2 Answers 2

You can't do this to Notepad. Notepad uses a plain edit control, which doesn't support colored text ranges. You need to wrap a rich edit control to do this (or use the Scintilla edit control, which Notepad++ does).

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Okay, what if I try to do this for notepad++ which does support highlighting, what would i need? –  T.Y. Kucuk Oct 9 '13 at 20:30
    
Well according to the Scintilla Documentation, you would get the window handle & send messages to it. The relevant messages look like SCI_SETINDICATORCURRENT and SCI_SETINDICATORFILLRANGE. –  Eric Brown Oct 9 '13 at 20:46

This page here from MSDN seems exactly what you're looking for.

From MSDN: You can add different visual effects to the editor by creating Managed Extensibility Framework (MEF) component parts. This walkthrough shows how to highlight every occurrence of the current word in a text file. If a word occurs more than one time in a text file, and you position the caret in one occurrence, every occurrence is highlighted

This will guide you on how to create an application that when you highlight a word it will highlight all matching words in Blue.

If you're not looking for a full solution then the concept is there and it is explained well.

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This is the VS editor, though - not notepad –  Marc Gravell Oct 9 '13 at 13:31
    
He mentions his C# project and he wants notepad with that functionality, the MSDN page I listed basically allows you to open the application then highlight any text with a text file (notepad) to highlight all other words. - I am being presumptuous in assuming he's using Visual Studio I guess. –  Samuel Nicholson Oct 9 '13 at 13:34
    
given that it talks about pInvoke and "Notepad instances, handles etc" - I genuinely do think he's referring to regular vanilla notepad. –  Marc Gravell Oct 9 '13 at 13:35
    
Well I possibly misunderstood the question, if he's talking about a notepad without using VS then I don't even understand the question, I mean is it even possible? Thanks for clarifying. –  Samuel Nicholson Oct 9 '13 at 13:37
    
As Marc understood, I meant classic notepad.exe which I want to highlight text. For example, when I select a word inside notepad.exe, my app listen all events of it, then it will find repeated words inside the Edit Control of Notepad and highlight all of them. –  T.Y. Kucuk Oct 9 '13 at 13:45

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