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For my project, there has been an update to the UI-side code. It has been converted from VB6 to VB.NET. Because of this, I'd like to change how the UI-side code interacts with my engine-side code.

Currently, the engine-side code is a COM object that is produced as follows:

_engine = CreateObject("MyEngine")

I'd like to change this so that it would load the engine as a .NET assembly. Something like:

Dim asm As Reflection.Assembly = Reflection.Assembly.LoadFrom("MyEngine.dll")
_engine = asm.CreateInstance("TestEngine")

So to achieve this, I've modified the native C++ CEngine class to be compiled with /clr. After fiddling with some project settings, it has compiled successfully.

The next part is my problem (I have little experience in this). I need to have it "visible" in .NET. So from reading online, it seems the best solution is to create a managed class to "wrap" around my native class.

Here's some code for my little wrapper...nothing too complicated:

Wrapper.h

public ref class TestEngine
{
public:
    TestEngine(void);
    virtual ~TestEngine(void);
protected:
    !TestEngine(void);
private:
    CEngine *_engine; // native (COM) c++ object pointer
};

Wrapper.cpp

#include "Wrapper.h"
TestEngine::TestEngine(void)
{
    _engine = new CEngine();
}

TestEngine::~TestEngine(void)
{
    if (_engine)
    {
        delete _engine;
        _engine = NULL;
    }
}

TestEngine::!TestEngine(void)
{
    if (_engine)
    {
        delete _engine;
        _engine = NULL;
    }
}

So the error here is I cannot instantiate CEngine because its COM methods (QueryInterface, AddRef, and Release) are abstract. So my question is, should I derive this class and instantiate the derived class? Am I even going in the right path here? My main goal is to get rid of the unmanaged/managed boundary between my UI code and engine code if possible. So eliminating the use of COM internally, and instead, loading .NET assemblies.

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1 Answer 1

I have relatively little experience with COM interop, but in my experience, you can just add a reference to the COM DLL to your project and it automatically runs tlbimp.exe which creates a COM interop assembly (a managed assembly which has runtime-callable wrappers for all the COM classes).

Check this page out: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/697w37zd.aspx

I've used this approach in a handful of projects.

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Thanks - actually, I think the project is using some interop dlls to act as an interface to the engine methods. But in any case, my boss wants these interop dlls to go away and load the assemblies instead. Apparently, they are causing the project unit tests to fail... –  ryrich Oct 9 '13 at 14:08

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