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I have an XML document with a node containing the escaped XML serialization of another object, as in this example:

<attribute>
  <value>
    &lt;map&gt;
      &lt;item&gt;
        &lt;src&gt;something&lt;/src&gt;
        &lt;dest&gt;something else&lt;/dest&gt;
      &lt;/item&gt;
    &lt;/map&gt;  
  </value>
</attribute>  

How can I apply an xslt template to the inner xml? In particolar, I would like to get an html table with the couples src/dest:

| src       | dest           |
| something | something else |  
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would do this as a two-step operation.

Step1.xsl:

<xsl:stylesheet 
  version="1.0" 
  xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
>
  <xsl:template match="/">
    <root>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="attribute/value" />
    </root>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="value">
    <object>
      <xsl:value-of select="." disable-output-escaping="yes" />
    </object>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

to produce intermediary XML:

<root>
  <object>
    <map>
      <item>
        <src>something</src>
        <dest>something else</dest>
      </item>
    </map>
  </object>
</root>

Step2.xsl

<xsl:stylesheet 
  version="1.0" 
  xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
>
  <xsl:template match="object">
    <table>
      <tr>
        <xsl:for-each select="map/item/*">
          <th>
            <xsl:value-of select="name()" />
          </th>
        </xsl:for-each>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <xsl:for-each select="map/item/*">
          <td>
            <xsl:value-of select="." />
          </td>
        </xsl:for-each>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

to produce an HTML table

<table>
  <tr>
    <th>src</th>
    <th>dest</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>something</td>
    <td>something else</td>
  </tr>
</table>
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Nice approach on this. –  mallows98 Dec 18 '09 at 11:56
    
Note that this requires an XSLT processor that has control over serialization; not all do, and so not all processors are required to be able to honor disable-output-escaping. However in a situation where your processor honors d-o-e this is a convenient solution. –  LarsH Oct 28 '10 at 11:39
    
@LarsH: Most stand-alone processors do support d-o-e, but there are some (like the one embedded in Firefox IIRC) that don't. The alternative would be to have the element content (XML string) parsed as an XML document via an extension function. –  Tomalak Oct 28 '10 at 12:23
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Extract the value attribute into an XML document of it's own and transform that.

You will not be able to do this in a single XSLT without alot of substring replacements.

If you can control the format of the XML document, consider putting the node data into a CDATA section and not escaping the < and >.

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"You will not be able to do this in a single XSLT", period. Because a string is a string is a string, no matter if it looks like XML. With some extension function maybe, but otherwise not in one step. –  Tomalak Dec 18 '09 at 11:36
    
@Tomalak, theoretically, you can analyze a string in XSLT and output a corresponding node tree. So it's not true that "You will not be able to do this in a single XSLT, period." However it would be hairy and maybe not worth it. –  LarsH Oct 28 '10 at 11:37
    
@Oded, I don't see how putting the data into a CDATA section would help. Maybe you're just saying that would let the author of the XML avoid typing so many entities. It wouldn't change the need to parse that inner XML, right? –  LarsH Oct 28 '10 at 11:53
    
@LarsH - correct. –  Oded Oct 28 '10 at 11:58
    
@LarsH: I was referring to vanilla XSLT 1.0, where you indeed cannot do this in a single step. Of course there are ways to get that done in a single XSLT program, but these are not necessarily portable between processors. –  Tomalak Oct 28 '10 at 12:27
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