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I know I can get the size of the primary screen by using

System.Windows.SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenWidth;
System.Windows.SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenHeight;

But how do I get the size of the current screen? (Multi-Screen users do not always use the primary screen and not all screens are using the same resolution, right?)

It would be nice to be able to acces the size from XAML, but doing so from code (C#) would suffice.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As far as I know there is no native WPF function to get dimensions of the current monitor. Instead you could PInvoke native multiple display monitors functions, wrap them in managed class and expose all properties you need to consume them from XAML.

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That is exactly what I feared -- the need to P/Invoke the stuff or accessing System.Windows.Forms.Screen somehow. And when doing so I always need to calculte the "device independent pixels"... Thanks, though. –  Nils Dec 18 '09 at 11:53
    
Yes... Maybe SystemParameters.ConvertPixel() function will also help you. It's internal, but Reflector doesn't care :)... –  Anvaka Dec 18 '09 at 12:05

I created a little wrapper around the Screen from System.Windows.Forms, currently everything works... Not sure about the "device independent pixels", though.

public class WpfScreen
{
    public static IEnumerable<WpfScreen> AllScreens()
    {
        foreach (Screen screen in System.Windows.Forms.Screen.AllScreens)
        {
            yield return new WpfScreen(screen);
        }
    }

    public static WpfScreen GetScreenFrom(Window window)
    {
        WindowInteropHelper windowInteropHelper = new WindowInteropHelper(window);
        Screen screen = System.Windows.Forms.Screen.FromHandle(windowInteropHelper.Handle);
        WpfScreen wpfScreen = new WpfScreen(screen);
        return wpfScreen;
    }

    public static WpfScreen GetScreenFrom(Point point)
    {
        int x = (int) Math.Round(point.X);
        int y = (int) Math.Round(point.Y);

        // are x,y device-independent-pixels ??
        System.Drawing.Point drawingPoint = new System.Drawing.Point(x, y);
        Screen screen = System.Windows.Forms.Screen.FromPoint(drawingPoint);
        WpfScreen wpfScreen = new WpfScreen(screen);

        return wpfScreen;
    }

    public static WpfScreen Primary
    {
        get { return new WpfScreen(System.Windows.Forms.Screen.PrimaryScreen); }
    }

    private readonly Screen screen;

    internal WpfScreen(System.Windows.Forms.Screen screen)
    {
        this.screen = screen;
    }

    public Rect DeviceBounds
    {
        get { return this.GetRect(this.screen.Bounds); }
    }

    public Rect WorkingArea
    {
        get { return this.GetRect(this.screen.WorkingArea); }
    }

    private Rect GetRect(Rectangle value)
    {
        // should x, y, width, height be device-independent-pixels ??
        return new Rect
                   {
                       X = value.X,
                       Y = value.Y,
                       Width = value.Width,
                       Height = value.Height
                   };
    }

    public bool IsPrimary
    {
        get { return this.screen.Primary; }
    }

    public string DeviceName
    {
        get { return this.screen.DeviceName; }
    }
}
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Thanks for this great little wrapper, note that the global::Rect needed converting to just plain Rect when I used with WPF 3.5. –  Andy Dent Jun 7 '10 at 10:51
    
SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenHeight gets the "device independent pixels". This unfortunately does not get "device independent pixels", rather the physical pixels. Oh well. –  Mark Lopez Oct 14 at 3:47

Take the time to scan through the SystemParameters members.

  • VirtualScreenWidth
  • VirtualScreenHeight

These even take into account the relative positions of the screens.

Only tested with two monitors.

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2  
dana - I have not tested this, but doesn't VirtualScreen* return the full size of all screens? - I specifically Need the size of one screen (the one in which the current window resides). –  Nils May 19 '10 at 11:40
    
VirtualScreen seems to refer to the size of all screens –  Thomas Oct 31 '10 at 23:16

Here budy. This will give you only the width and height of the workarea

System.Windows.SystemParameters.WorkArea.Width
System.Windows.SystemParameters.WorkArea.Height
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"Gets the size of the work area on the primary display monitor." - not what I was looking for.... –  Nils Sep 10 '13 at 5:03
double screenWidth = System.Windows.SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenWidth;
double screenhight= System.Windows.SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenHeight;
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Like the previous answer this is only for the primary Screen. I needed the current screen. –  Nils Nov 18 '13 at 17:57

This will give you the current screen based on the top left of the window just call this.CurrentScreen() to get info on the current screen.

using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace Common.Helpers
{
    public static class WindowHelpers
     {
        public static Screen CurrentScreen(this Window window)
         {
             return Screen.FromPoint(new System.Drawing.Point((int)window.Left,(int)window.Top));
         }
     }
}
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Looks a bit like stackoverflow.com/a/2118993/180156 –  Nils Mar 12 at 16:31

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