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I wrote a program to remove a certain word (taken as user input) from a file. I read the word, opened the file from which I wanted to delete the word, read each line in the file and split it into words, and compared each word with my keyword. If they are not a match, I printed them into a temporary file.

But when I open the temp file, the entire text has been copied. Can somebody help me????

#include<stdio.h>
#include<fcntl.h>
#include<string.h>

main()
{
int i;
FILE *fp1,*fp2;
char key[1000],a[1000],temp[1000];

printf("\nEnter the word to be deleted from file : ");
scanf("%s",key);

fp1 = fopen("a.txt","r");
fp2 = fopen("b.txt","w");

while(fgets(a,1000,fp1))
{
    for(i=0;a[i]!='\0';++i)

        if(a[i]==' ')
            break;
        else            
            temp[i]=a[i];
    temp[i]='\0';
    if(strcmp(temp,key)!=0)
    {
        fputs(temp,fp2);
    }

    bzero(a,1000);
}

fclose(fp1);
fclose(fp2);

printf("\n\n");

/*remove("a.txt");
rename("b.txt","a.txt");*/

}
share|improve this question
5  
What is your question? –  Code-Apprentice Oct 9 '13 at 16:09
1  
OK, congratulations, but that's a slow way to do it. Was there a question there? –  Dan Oct 9 '13 at 16:10
    
write to a tmp file then move it. –  Grady Player Oct 9 '13 at 16:10
1  
im sorry, i edited it with a question –  Hari K Oct 9 '13 at 16:10
    
i did, bt it dint work –  Hari K Oct 9 '13 at 16:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yet another solution. It has some of the same problems mentioned above, for example the boundaries of a word do not really match English grammar. It also has an inefficiency of doing more copies than is strictly necessary in some cases.

However, I prefer this version over yours because it abstracts the word removal task rather than doing it inline with the rest of the code. Plus it works better.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void remove_str2(char* buffer, char* find, int lfind) {
  char* paste = strstr(buffer, find);
  if (!paste) { return; }
  char* start = paste + lfind;

  while (1) {
    char* end = strstr(start, find);
    if (!end) {
      end = start + strlen(start) + 1;
    }
    memmove(paste, start, end - start);

    paste += end - start;
    start = strstr(end, find);
    if (!start) { return; }
    start += lfind;
  }
}

void remove_str(char* buffer, char* find, int lfind) {
  char* p = strstr(buffer, find);
  if (p) {
    remove_str(p + lfind, find, lfind);
    // shift everything left
    do { *p = *(p + lfind); } while (*(++p));
  }
}

int main() {
  FILE *fp1, *fp2;
  char key[1000], a[1000];

  // require key to be preceeded by a space
  key[0] = ' ';

  printf("\nEnter the word to be deleted from file : ");
  scanf("%s", &key[1]);

  fp1 = fopen("a.txt","r");
  fp2 = fopen("b.txt","w");

  while (fgets(a, 1000, fp1)) {
    remove_str(a, key, strlen(key));
    fputs(a, fp2);
  }

  fclose(fp1);
  fclose(fp2);

  printf("\n\n");

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
can you explain the removal processs? –  Hari K Oct 9 '13 at 17:37
    
@HariKMalayath, strstr (en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/byte/strstr) does a substring search for key in your input buffer. If it is not found, then return because there is no work to do. If it is found it skips over it and searches the rest of the buffer for key, and so on recursively. As the stack unwinds it copies all the characters back over the keys to be removed. As I said, there is an inefficiency there, but it is simple to understand and code. –  Adam Burry Oct 9 '13 at 17:48
    
For comparison purposes, I added a version of remove_str that minimizes the copying. –  Adam Burry Oct 9 '13 at 19:20
    
It does not respect the word-boundaries. (see my comment on the OQ) –  wildplasser Oct 9 '13 at 19:29
    
@wildplasser, the question does not specify start and end constraints for word boundaries other than those used in the broken sample code. –  Adam Burry Oct 9 '13 at 23:44

Tried to compile it and it works almost fine except it doesn't insert spaces in output file ;)

if(strcmp(temp,key)!=0)
{
    temp[i++] = ' ';
    temp[i] = '\0';
    fputs(temp,fp2);
}

Also, its' very sensitive code. It doesn't work if I have a line of words. And it shouldn't work if your test file has a spaces before word and your keyword doesn't.

share|improve this answer

Some observations,

main()
{
    //you will need input index, output index
    int in, on; //in: input index, on: output index
    FILE *fp1,*fp2;
    char key[1000],iray[1000],oray[1000];
    char* here; //clarifies the comparison

    printf("\nEnter the word to be deleted from file : ");
    scanf("%s",key);
    printf("key: %s",key); fflush(stdout);

    if(!(fp1 = fopen("a.txt","r"))) { printf("open error\n"); exit(1); }
    if(!(fp2 = fopen("b.txt","w"))) { printf("open error\n"); exit(2); }

    while(fgets(iray,sizeof(iray),fp1))
    {
        printf("line: %s",iray); fflush(stdout);
        for(in=on=0; iray[in]; ++in) //'\0' = 0 = false //please indent
        {   //please use braces
            //printf("%d: %c\n",in,iray[in]); fflush(stdout);
            if(iray[in]==' ')
            {
                oray[on++] = iray[in];
                continue; //break gets you out of loop
            }
            here = &(iray[in]);
            //printf("here: %s\n",here); fflush(stdout);
            if( !strcmp(here,key) ) //have word?
            {
                in+=strlen(key); //skip word
                continue;
            }
            oray[on++] = iray[in];
        }
        oray[on] = '\0';
        printf("line: %s",oray); fflush(stdout);
        fputs(oray,fp2);
        iray[0]=0; //bzero(iray,1000);
        oray[0]=0; //bzero(oray,1000);
    }
    fclose(fp1);
}
share|improve this answer

Part of the problem is that as soon as you find a space you process the word, but you don't finish processing the remainder of the line. After the fputs, you go to the top of the loop and read another line. When I compile and run your snippet, it indeed ouputs the first word of each line as long as it's not the selected word.

Also when outputting your words, you don't output any space between them and there is no carriage return at the end of lines. Thus all non-matching words are output back-to-back on one line.

There's a few more issues that the following snippet fixes (there's some remaining problems that I didn't solve-- for example, the last non-matching word on a line is not output if there is no trailing space on the line. You can solve this by looking for '\0' as well as space. I didn't do it because it requires changing the loop structure to not exit when '\0' is seen so you get a chance to test for it):

    while(fgets(a,1000,fp1))
    {
        int j = 0;
        for(i=0;a[i]!='\0';++i)

            if((a[i]==' '){
             temp[j++]='\0';
             if(strcmp(temp,key)!=0) {
                fprintf (fp2, "%s ", temp);
                }
             j = 0;
            }
           else
             temp[j++]=a[i];
          fprintf (fp2, "\n");
    }
share|improve this answer

EDIT: a complete solution: this is how your loop should look like:

while(fgets(a,1000,fp1))
{
  int j=0;
  for(i=0;a[i]!='\0';++i)
  {
    if(a[i]==' ')
    {
       temp[j]=0;
       if(strcmp(temp,key)!=0)
       {
          fputs(temp,fp2);
       }
       j=0;
       //this should be after fputs if you want to remove the space after obsolete word. 
        fputs(" ",fp2);         
    }
    else            
       temp[j++]=a[i];          
  }
  //last word if there is no space after!
  if(strcmp(temp,key)!=0)
  {
    fputs(temp,fp2);
  }
  fputs("\n",fp2);
  a[0] = 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
you should use isspace(x) instead x==' ' –  SHR Oct 9 '13 at 17:21

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