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I am working on a javascript code that looks like the following. I am only showing the basic skeleton of the code first.

var array = [];

function mainFun()
{
     A();
}
function A()
{
    //some code
    B();
    //code to print all values in "array"
}

function B()
{
    C();
}

function C()
{
     //some code
     //push elements one by one in "array"
     for (var i=0; i<10; i++)
     {
           array.push(i); //something on these lines
     }
}

I know this code seems bizarre but this is exactly the situation I am working on. Thanks to Javascript's function level scoping (as against the regular block-level scoping), I am unable to access and print all the elements in A() that have been pushed in the array in C(). So how can I make my array variable work like a true global variable that has knowledge of what elements were pushed into it?

Ok, here is my original source code (I don't know how the dummy code worked though!)

var allLinks = {}; //set of all internal and external links
var Queued = [];
var crawlingURL;
var Crawled = [];
var xmlHttp = null, originURL, maxHops = 0, currentHop = 0;

function changeText(){
    var tabID, sourceURL;
    chrome.tabs.query({currentWindow: true, active: true}, function(tabs){
        console.log(tabs[0].url);
        document.getElementById('URL').innerHTML="URL of Current Page : "+tabs[0].url;
        tabID = tabs[0].id;
        sourceURL = tabs[0].url;

        Queued.push(sourceURL); //push the origin link the Queued array to begin crawling
        beginCrawl(sourceURL);
    });
}

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', function () {
    changeText();
});

function beginCrawl(url)
{
    originURL = url;
    maxHops = 2;
    currentHop = 1;
    var queueIndex = 0;
    //httpGet(originURL);
    while(queueIndex<1) //(currentHop <= maxHops)
    {
        crawlingURL = Queued[queueIndex];
        //allPages[crawlingURL] = {url:url, state:"crawling", level:0, host:startingHost};
        httpGet(crawlingURL);
        Crawled.push(crawlingURL);
        queueIndex++;

        for(var j = 0; j < Queued.length; j++)
        {
            console.log(j+". "+Queued[j]+"\n");
        }
    }
}
function httpGet(theUrl)
{
    xmlHttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xmlHttp.open( "GET", theUrl, true );
    xmlHttp.send( null );
    xmlHttp.onreadystatechange = ProcessRequest;
}

function ProcessRequest()
{
    if ( xmlHttp.readyState == 4 && xmlHttp.status == 200 ) // xmlHTTP success
    {           
            var container = document.createElement("p");
            container.innerHTML = xmlHttp.responseText;
            var anchors = container.getElementsByTagName("a");
            var list = [];
            for (var i = 0; i < anchors.length; i++) 
            {
                var href = anchors[i].href;
                var exists = 0;

                // to check for duplicate entries in the list
                    for(var j = 0; j < Queued.length; j++)  // remove duplicates
                        if(Queued[j] == href)
                            exists = 1;
                    if (exists == 0)
                    {
                        Queued.push(href);
                        document.getElementById('printORGLinks').innerHTML += href + "<br />";
                    }
            }
        }
}

I am unable to get print the values in my Queued Array ! (As you may understand, this is a preliminary code for a web crawler of some sort. I need to get the list of all URLs pushed into the Queued array).

share|improve this question
1  
What exactly are you asking? Your array variable is global, so you can access it anywhere. –  Joe Enos Oct 9 '13 at 16:14
1  
Your code works fine. –  SLaks Oct 9 '13 at 16:14
1  
Any chance that the part that pushes new values to the array is inside an AJAX call? –  Juhana Oct 9 '13 at 16:25
1  
Yup, it's an AJAX issue. You're trying to access the array before httpGet(crawlingURL); has completed. –  Andy Oct 9 '13 at 16:49
2  
No, the call to httpGet() returns immediately without the browser even starting the ajax call. It merely tells the browser to schedule a HTTP request when it has free CPU time and the browser doesn't have free CPU time while js is running. Only after js has completed running and passes over execution to the browser does the browser notice that it has to make an HTTP request. When the request is done several seconds later the browser calls the ProcessRequest callback. That's the whole point of callbacks - a mechanism for you to tell the browser what to execute after some asynchronous event. –  slebetman Oct 9 '13 at 18:29

1 Answer 1

This works as you've entered it - fiddle here http://jsfiddle.net/LmFqq/1/

Output

some code executing in A()
some code executing in B()
adding elements in C()
printing in A()
[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]

Code

var array = [];
var el = document.getElementById('output');
mainFun();

function log(msg) {
    el.innerHTML += msg + "<br />";
}

function mainFun()
{
     A();
}

function A()
{
    log("some code executing in A()");
    B();

    log("printing in A()");
    log(JSON.stringify(array));
}

function B()
{
    log("some code executing in B()");
    C();
}

function C()
{
    log("adding elements in C()");
     for (var i=0; i<10; i++)
     {
           array.push(i); //something on these lines
     }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
"You don't have a problem" isn't an answer. –  Juhana Oct 9 '13 at 16:26

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