Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public GuiC() {
    getContentPane().addKeyListener(new KeyAdapter() {
        @Override
        public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
            System.out.println("hi");

        }
    });
    setBackground(Color.GREEN);
    setTitle("Hi!");
    setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    setBounds(100, 100, 500, 500);
    getContentPane().setLayout(null);

}

so this is my frame did i do something wrong here?because the keyevent isnt being called when i press any key please help :)

share|improve this question
    
Avoid using KeyListener and rather use Swing Keybindings (just google "Swing Key bindings" for more info). It will save you tremendous amount of time. Also, you should really avoid null-layout such as this: getContentPane().setLayout(null); –  Guillaume Polet Oct 9 '13 at 17:42

2 Answers 2

You may need to request focus.

public GuiC() {
    this.getContentPane().requestFocus(); //request focus here
    this.getContentPane().addKeyListener(new KeyListener() {
    @Override
    public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
        System.out.println("hi: " + e.getKeyChar());

    }
});
    setBackground(Color.GREEN);
    setTitle("Hi!");
    setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    setBounds(100, 100, 500, 500);
    getContentPane().setLayout(null);

}

Additional reading: How to Write a Key Listener

share|improve this answer
    
Kudos for citing the tutorial, but shouldn't you follow its advice on requesting focus? –  trashgod Oct 9 '13 at 17:16

Your code as such is fine. I usually use a KeyListener

getContentPane().addKeyListener(new KeyListener() {
        @Override
        public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
            System.out.println("hi");

See here for a tutorial:

http://java.about.com/od/Handling-Events/ss/A-Keylistener-Example-Program.htm
http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/events/keylistener.html

I personally dislike the anonymous class solution.

The Oracle way of doing it is much cleaner.

//make your class implement KeyListener
public class KeyEventDemo ...  implements KeyListener ... {  

//use `this` as the listener
typingArea.addKeyListener(this);  <<-- simple

//Add the relevant listeners to the class
/** Handle the key-pressed event from the text field. */
public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
    displayInfo(e, "KEY PRESSED: ");
}

/** Handle the key-released event from the text field. */
public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {
    displayInfo(e, "KEY RELEASED: ");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, didn't spot that it wasn't a KeyListener. I updated my answer to include this. –  TEK Oct 9 '13 at 16:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.