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This should be obvious, but I'm getting a bit confused about PHP variable scope.

I have a variable inside a Constructor, which I want to use later in a function in the same class. My current method is this:

<?php

class Log(){

   function Log(){
      $_ENV['access'] = true;
   }

   function test(){
      $access = $ENV['access'];
   }

}

?>

Is there a better way to do this than abusing environment variables? Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You could use a class variable, which has a context of... a class :
(Example for PHP 5, of course ; I've re-written a few things so your code is more PHP5-compliant)

class Log {
   // Declaration of the propery
   protected $_myVar;

   public function __construct() {
      // The property is accessed via $this->nameOfTheProperty :
      $this->_myVar = true;
   }

   public function test() {
      // Once the property has been set in the constructor, it keeps its value for the whole object :
      $access = $this->_myVar;
   }

}

You should take a look at :

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1  
I don't think the () after the class is valid...? –  SeanJA Dec 18 '09 at 12:18
1  
@SeanJA : oh yes, of course, you're right ; I didn't see those when I copy-pasted the code from the OP ;; thanks for your note ! –  Pascal MARTIN Dec 18 '09 at 12:20
    
Ya, I missed it too when I was pasting it into mine... –  SeanJA Dec 18 '09 at 12:21

Globals are considered harmful. If this is an outside dependency, pass it through the constructor and save it inside a property for later use. If you need this to be set only during the call to test, you might want to consider making it an argument to that method.

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That is what I said with an example, -1 for me! –  SeanJA Dec 18 '09 at 12:30

You could use the global keyword:

class Log{
    protected $access;
    function Log(){
        global $access;
        $this->access = &$access;
    }
}

But you really should be passing the variable in the constructor:

class Log{
    protected $access;
    function Log($access){
        $this->access = &$access;
    }
    //...Then you have access to the access variable throughout the class:
    function test(){
        echo $this->access;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for what? He wanted a global variable. –  SeanJA Dec 18 '09 at 12:26
    
Log() should be __construct() and both methods miss the public keyword. –  Gordon Dec 18 '09 at 12:55
    
Unless you want to be compatible with php 4 as well... then it would be log() –  SeanJA Dec 18 '09 at 13:27
    
yeah, but then you couldnt have the protected keyword ;) –  Gordon Dec 18 '09 at 13:39
    
And php4 classes have properties as well (though all being public) –  VolkerK Dec 18 '09 at 13:43

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