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I'm currently refactoring some code and am trying to remove the use of symbolic references below for dispatching a function based off input.

package Parent;
use strict;
use warnings;

sub dispatch{
  my ($self, $funcname) = @_;


  no strict "refs";
  if($self->can($funcname)){
    $self->$funcname();
  }
  else{
    $self->default_func();
  }
  use strict;
}

sub a{
  ...
}

sub b{
  ...
}

#...lots more functions...

sub default_func{
  ..
}

package Child;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Parent;

our @ISA = qw(Parent)

sub c{
  ..
}

I considered using a dispatch table like below, but this seems less than ideal since there's quite a bit of extra maintenance involved with tracking down all the subclasses and copying all the functions involved.

package Parent;
use strict;
use warnings;

{
  my $funcs ||= {
    a => sub { shift->a },
    b => sub { shift->b },
    c => sub { shift->c },
    #...lots of functions...
    DEFAULT => sub {shift->default_func}
  }
  sub dispatch{
    my ($self, $funcname) = @_;
    my $func = $funcs->{$funcname} || $funcs->{DEFAULT};
    $self->$func();
  }
}

Additionally, I considered turning the dispatch table to into a member so that the parent class doesn't have to be aware of the child classes as well. Then each child class would add its own functions to the dispatch table. Originally I did not want the dispatch table to be a member since I only wanted it to be exposed to one function but perhaps it's unavoidable. But in the end, turning it into a member does not fix the problem of the extra boilerplate and maintenance involved.

Is there a better way? This seems like a lot more work than symbolic references. I'm willing to do the extra work if it allows me to avoid a hacky solution but I'm not sure which direction to go from here.

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2  
There aren't any symbolic references in your first example. $self->can returns a code reference, and $self->$coderef will work fine under use strict. –  friedo Oct 9 '13 at 17:47
3  
$self->$name_of_method() works fine under use strict also. There's no need for the no strict 'refs' at all. –  cjm Oct 9 '13 at 17:52
2  
No, when using a string as a method name, it is not a symbolic reference (as @cjm points out) because the actual symbol is looked up by Perl's method dispatcher. A symbolic reference happens when you do something like &{ $funcname }() –  friedo Oct 9 '13 at 18:20
2  
Methods are always looked up by name at runtime, because that's when Perl knows which class $self is. (It's not necessarily always the same class.) So it doesn't really matter whether the method name is a constant or is stored in a variable. –  cjm Oct 9 '13 at 18:25
2  
@kei-clone, that's correct. (Or maybe it's better to say that all method calls are symbolic references.) –  cjm Oct 9 '13 at 18:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your original code example works fine under use strict. The $obj->$method(...) form does not require symbolic references. It's a widely-used technique and is considered good practice.

Also, note that even if you had to no strict, there is no need to use strict again at the end of the function as in your example. strict is a lexical pragma, so its effects are limited to its containing scope anyway.

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Why wouldn't you use AUTOLOAD?

package Parent;
use vars qw( $AUTOLOAD );
sub AUTOLOAD {
    return if $AUTOLOAD =~ m/^.*::(DESTROY)$/;
    my ($self, @params) =@_;
    return $self->$AUTOLOAD() if($self->can($AUTOLOAD)){
    return $self->default_func();
}
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