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I wrote this script and ran it on OSX 10.8 Mountain Lion, on the default case-insensitive HFS filesystem.

#!/bin/sh -x
# create git repo
rm -rf caps
git init caps
cd caps
# commit empty file called "file"
touch file
git add .
git commit -am "initial commit"
# create branch called "branch"
git branch branch
# rename "file" to "File"
# using --force per http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6899582
git mv --force file File
git commit -am "renamed capital"
# switch to branch, make a non-conflicting commit
git checkout branch
touch newfile
git add .
git commit -am "branch commit"
# merge master into branch, commit merge
git merge --commit --no-edit master
# but where's the renamed File?
more File

When the script was done, it failed on the last line, when it should have succeeded:

+ git merge --commit --no-edit master
Removing file
Merge made by the 'recursive' strategy.
 file => File | 0
 1 file changed, 0 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 rename file => File (100%)
+ more File
File: No such file or directory

git status showed this:

$ git status
# On branch branch
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   deleted:    File
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

We can get the file back at that point with git checkout File, but it's very easy at that point to accidentally commit the deletion.

We've been renaming quite a few files lately, fixing their capitalization, and this has bit our team a lot. Is there a git setting or best practice we can use to workaround this problem? (For now, we're just telling everybody to be extra extra careful.)

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Interesting. What is your core.ignorecase setting? –  Edward Thomson Oct 9 '13 at 19:44
    
I'm on OSX, so git-init and git-clone automatically set core.ignorecase to true. If I set it to false, I'm unable to merge from master at all, with this error: "error: The following untracked working tree files would be overwritten by merge: File". –  Dan Fabulich Oct 9 '13 at 23:10
    
I can't reproduce this with git 1.7.5.4 on Mac OS or Git for Windows 1.8.4. file is accurately renamed to File for me, following the steps you provided. –  Edward Thomson Oct 10 '13 at 1:50
    
I agree that it doesn't repro on git 1.7.5.4 for OS X, but it does repro on 1.8.4. That let me run a bisect which turned up github.com/git/git/commit/… which indicates that the problem only occurs when renaming empty files. (I bet you didn't use an empty file on Windows?) –  Dan Fabulich Oct 10 '13 at 17:00
    
Interesting. I did not use empty files; I wouldn't have expected that you had a lot of empty files that needed case-changing renames. Interesting find! –  Edward Thomson Oct 10 '13 at 17:19
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1 Answer 1

This problem only occurs when rename detection fails.

http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/235889

It just so happens that git disabled rename detection of empty files in git 1.8. https://github.com/git/git/commit/4f7cb99ada26be5d86402a6e060f3ee16a672f16

This script runs as expected on git 1.7 and git 1.8:

#!/bin/sh -x
# create git repo
git --version
rm -rf caps
git init caps
cd caps
git config --get core.ignorecase
# commit empty file called "file"
echo file > file
git add .
git commit -am "initial commit"
# create branch called "branch"
git branch branch
# rename "file" to "File"
# using --force per http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6899582
git mv --force file File
git commit -am "renamed to File"
# switch to branch, make a non-conflicting commit
git checkout branch
echo newfile > newfile
git add .
git commit -am "branch commit"
# merge master into branch, commit merge
GIT_EDITOR=true git merge --verbose --commit master
ls File
git status

But this script fails, due to a bug in git:

#!/bin/sh -x
# create git repo
git --version
rm -rf caps
git init caps
cd caps
git config --get core.ignorecase
# commit empty file called "file"
echo file > file
git add .
git commit -am "initial commit"
# create branch called "branch"
git branch branch
# rename "file" to "File"
# using --force per http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6899582
git mv --force file File
echo "completely different content" > File
git commit -am "renamed to File"
# switch to branch, make a non-conflicting commit
git checkout branch
echo newfile > newfile
git add .
git commit -am "branch commit"
# merge master into branch, commit merge
GIT_EDITOR=true git merge --verbose --commit master
ls File
git status
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