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I'm new to programing and I was playing with python what I've so far learnt form the tutorial that was where I encounter with an Error. I'd like to know what it means by the syntax Error: can't assign to literal and how to understand/ read the message so that the next time I can solve it myself. It's not that I don't like asking questions but a question this simple I expect myself to be able to answer it or at least know how to find an answer for it. Thanks in advance! :) here is what I did

>>> 1 = 1
SyntaxError: can't assign to literal (<pyshell#0>, line 1)
>>> 1 = 1
SyntaxError: can't assign to literal (<pyshell#1>, line 1)
>>> 1 != 1
False
>>> 

as you can see python gave me answer for the last question which is 1 != 1.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by plaes, codeape, devnull, bedwyr, Cristian Ciupitu Oct 9 '13 at 20:55

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Please post your code too... –  plaes Oct 9 '13 at 19:57
1  
You copied only the last part of the message. Please show the full traceback(the whole output, starting with Traceback ...). From what you wrote is clear that you tried to do something like "something" = value, when it should have been something = value(note the missing quotes "). –  Bakuriu Oct 9 '13 at 19:58
1  
As iCodez points out, you can't assign a value to a literal, which is what int values are. The '=' sign assigns a value to a reference, it's not a boolean operator for equality. Try this instead: 1 == 1. –  bedwyr Oct 9 '13 at 20:03

4 Answers 4

You probably meant "==", which compares for equality.

>>> 1==1
True 

A single equal sign means assignment, which roughly means to change what's to the left of the sign to match what's to the right. Trying to change a constant returns an error.

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1  
I think all the other answers missed the point... the OP clearly confused = with ==. –  SethMMorton Oct 9 '13 at 20:53

That error is generated when you try to make a variable out of a literal. See examples below:

>>> 1 = 'a'
  File "<stdin>", line 1
SyntaxError: can't assign to literal
>>> 'a' = 'a'
  File "<stdin>", line 1
SyntaxError: can't assign to literal
>>> 1.0 = 'a'
  File "<stdin>", line 1
SyntaxError: can't assign to literal
>>>

In Python, you can't make variables out of numbers, strings, etc. Only text (that isn't a reserved word) that starts with either a letter or an underscore can be made a variable:

>>> a = 1
>>> a
1
>>> _a = 1
>>> _a
1
>>>
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You can True = SomeRandomVariable (ex '1') in Python2 –  Vik2015 Oct 9 '13 at 20:03
    
@Vik2015 - Right. I'm used to Python 3.x. :) –  iCodez Oct 9 '13 at 20:04
    
@Vik2015: True isn't a literal. It's a keyword. (You get a SyntaxError: assignment to keyword if you try to do True = False in Python 3) –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 9 '13 at 20:32

This means that you're trying to assign a value to a literal (colloquially, something other than a variable). For example:

x = 1 # This is fine, x is a variable
1 = 1 # This fails, as 1 is a value, not a variable
"abcd" = 1 # This also fails, as "abcd" is a string literal
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A string is a literal; so are numbers. You can assign values to a variable (give them a name), but you can't change the value of a string, e. g.:

>>> a = "Hello"   # OK
>>> "Hello" = a   # Not OK
  File "<stdin>", line 1
SyntaxError: can't assign to literal
>>> 1 = 0
  File "<stdin>", line 1
SyntaxError: can't assign to literal
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I wasn't assigning them. I just found what I did wrong. I was comparing them but I forgot I should have used to == signs instead of one. thanks for all the answers. :) it was just a small confusion! –  user2856873 Oct 9 '13 at 20:14
    
@user2856873: Well, if you used one = then you were assigning them. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 9 '13 at 20:32

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