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I’d like to be pointed toward a reference that could better explain recursion when a function employs multiple recursive calls. I think I get how Python handles memory when a function employs a single instance of recursion. I can use print statements to track where the data is at any given point while the function processes the data. I can then walk each of those steps back to see how the resultant return value was achieved.

Once multiple instances of recursion are firing off during a single function call I am no longer sure how the data is actually being processed. The previously illuminating method of well-placed print statements reveals a process that looks quantum, or at least more like voodoo.

To illustrate my quandary here are two basic examples: the Fibonacci and Hanoi towers problems.

def getFib(n):
    if n == 1 or n == 2:
        return 1
    return getFib(n-1) + getFib(n-2)

The Fibonacci example features two inline calls. Is getFib(n-1) resolved all the way through the stack first, then getFib(n-2) resolved similarly, each of the resultants being put into new stacks, and those stacks added together line by line, with those sums being totaled for the result?

def hanoi(n, s, t, b):
    assert n > 0
    if n ==1:
        print 'move ', s, ' to ', t
    else:
        hanoi(n-1,s,b,t)
        hanoi(1,s,t,b)
        hanoi(n-1,b,t,s)

Hanoi presents a different problem, in that the function calls are in successive lines. When the function gets to the first call, does it resolve it to n=1, then move to the second call which is already n=1, then to the third until n=1?

Again, just looking for reference material that can help me get smart on what’s going on under the hood here. I’m sure it’s likely a bit much to explain in this setting.

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I think the first function would recurse forever with n=<0 –  Alois Mahdal Oct 9 '13 at 20:16
    
I don't understand your question. In particular "Is getFib(n-1) resolved all the way through the stack first, then getFib(n-2) resolved similarly, each of the resultants being put into new stacks, and those stacks added together line by line, with those sums being totaled for the result?" What does this mean? getFib(n-1) is evaluated, which means the interpreter executes all the code until it receive its return value. That code happens to contain other calls to getFib. –  Bakuriu Oct 9 '13 at 20:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

http://www.pythontutor.com/visualize.html

There's even a Hanoi link there so you can follow the flow of code.

This is a link to the hanoi code that they show on their site, but it may have to be adapated to visualize your exact code.

http://www.pythontutor.com/visualize.html#code=%23+move+a+stack+of+n+disks+from+stack+a+to+stack+b,%0A%23+using+tmp+as+a+temporary+stack%0Adef+TowerOfHanoi(n,+a,+b,+tmp)%3A%0A++++if+n+%3D%3D+1%3A%0A++++++++b.append(a.pop())%0A++++else%3A%0A++++++++TowerOfHanoi(n-1,+a,+tmp,+b)%0A++++++++b.append(a.pop())%0A++++++++TowerOfHanoi(n-1,+tmp,+b,+a)%0A++++++++%0Astack1+%3D+%5B4,3,2,1%5D%0Astack2+%3D+%5B%5D%0Astack3+%3D+%5B%5D%0A++++++%0A%23+transfer+stack1+to+stack3+using+Tower+of+Hanoi+rules%0ATowerOfHanoi(len(stack1),+stack1,+stack3,+stack2)&mode=display&cumulative=false&heapPrimitives=false&drawParentPointers=false&textReferences=false&showOnlyOutputs=false&py=2&curInstr=0

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It might be me, but that doesn't seem to help. :) –  Tony Hopkinson Oct 9 '13 at 20:30
    
Thanks Garth, the visual representation helps immensely. –  jmike Oct 9 '13 at 20:46
    
Yeah, it's not for everyone, but it does show you the stack and everything at the same time. Just another way to look at it. –  Garth5689 Oct 9 '13 at 21:00

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