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places= ["Home","In-n Out Burger", "John's house", "Santa Monica Pier", "Staples center",  "LA Dodgers stadium", "Home"]
def placesCount(places):
    multi_word = 0
    count = 0
    while True:
        place = places[count]
        if ' ' in place and place!='LA Dodgers stadium' **""" or anything that comes after LA dodgers stadium"""** :
            multi_word += 1
        if '' in place and place!='LA Dodgers stadium' """ **or anything that comes after LA dodgers stadium**""":
            count += 1
    print (count, "places to LA dodgers stadium"),  print (multi_word)
placesCount(places)

I basically want to know how I can stop the while-loop from adding to the list when it reaches a certain element of the list ("LA Dodgers Stadium") in this case. It should not add anything after it reaches that element of the list. I know I asked this question before but I did not recieve a proper answer.

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5 Answers 5

You might wish to alter you loop condition. Instead of while True try:

place = places[0]
while place != "LA Dodgers Stadium" and count < len(places):

    if ' ' in place:
        multi_word += 1

    count += 1
    place = places[count]

Edit: possibly a better way of writing this might be:

for place in places:
    if place == "LA Dodgers Stadium": break
    if ' ' in place: multi_word += 1
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and count < len(places), What does this Line Mean? –  user2821664 Oct 10 '13 at 2:17
    
@user2821664: count < len(places) stops the loop if count exceeds the highest index number of places. –  cdarke Oct 10 '13 at 11:49

(pseudo code)

flag = true

while (flag)
    ...
    if (place == LA Dodgers stadium)
    {
        flag = false
    }
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running = True

while running:

    user_input = raw_input("cmd> ")
    if user_input == "q":
        running = False

OR

while True:

    user_input = raw_input("cmd> ")
    if user_input == "q":
        break

Take a look here, here and here :)

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well, the quickest way for simple things like that is:

places.index('LA Dodgers Stadium')

which will raise a ValueError exception if it's not there, but return the index if it is. then you can do

while count < dodgersindex:

for your loop. even better, you can do:

while place in places[:dodgersindex]:

which lets you work on the words directly, instead of indices - more pythonic.

as a more general case. you would use continue or break to break execution... the difference is like this:

x = -1
while x < 100:
    x += 1
    if x % 2 == 0:
        continue
    if somearray[x] > 100:
        break

the continue means 'don't try the rest of this loop iteration, go on to the next one' - for the first item, it will check to see if x%2 == 0, see that it does, and not even look to see if somearray[x] > 100. But it will just go one to the next entry (which will cause x to be incremented to 1). However, the break will cause the entire loop to exit... if at entry 51, we find that somearray[51] > 100, we won't check the rest of the items, but will exit immediately.

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As I read in you previous question, print(placesCount) doesn't work because placesCount is a function that returns nothing. And you are trying to print a function object not what the function returns.

Adding a return to the end of your function. Should work. And the print statement should be like, print(placesCount(argument))

But, I would suggest that you not iterate over your list with file achieve what you are doing now.

You can do this using list comprehensions. Which are usually faster than manually looping over lists.

def placesCount(places):
    last_index = places.index('LA Dodgers stadium')

    multi_word = len([item for item in places[:last_index] if ' ' in item])
    count = len(places[:last_index])
    return count + "places to LA dodgers stadium\n" + (multi_word)

print(placesCount(places))

If you want to use while loop.

def placesCount(places):
    count = 0
    while True:
        place = place[count]
        multi_word += 1 if ' ' in place else 0
        if place == 'LA Dodgers stadium':
            break
        count +=1
    return count + "places to LA dodgers stadium\n" + (multi_word)

print(placesCount(places))
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