Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm fairly experienced with opengl and GLSL. For my engine I wanted to implement deferred lighting, knowing it was not going to be a trivial task. After a few hours I was able to get things mostly working. Here is a screenshot of all the buffers I've rendered:

enter image description here The upper left is the normals, the upper right is the albedo, the lower left is the position and the lower right is the final render. (There is only one light being rendered right now.) I use various shaders to render all the things to a frame buffer. I had previously used a forward rendering lighting shader. To hopefully provide the same results, I used the same data from that vertex shader to render the different buffers. The light source moves and changes based on the position of my camera, unlike my forward renderer. Here is the code for the vertex shaders (the fragment ones just render the pixels they got from the vertex one)

Position shader:

varying vec4 pos;
void main(void)
{
    gl_Position =gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix*gl_Vertex;
    pos = gl_ModelViewMatrix*gl_Vertex;
}

Normal shader

varying vec3 normal;
void main(void)
{
     gl_Position =gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix*gl_Vertex;
    normal = normalize(gl_NormalMatrix*gl_Normal);
}

For the albedo I just use opengl's regular shader and just bind textures.

Here is the final light shader which is being rendered as a quad over the screen:

uniform sampler2D positionMap;
uniform sampler2D normalMap;
uniform sampler2D albedoMap;
varying vec2 texcoord;
uniform mat4 matrix;
void main()
{
    vec3 position = vec3(texture2D(positionMap,texcoord));
    vec3 normal = vec3(texture2D(normalMap,texcoord));

    vec3 L = normalize(gl_LightSource[0].position.xyz - position);
    float l = length(L)/5.0;
    float att = 1.0/(l*l+l);

    //render sun light
    vec4 diffuselight = max(dot(normal,L), 0.0)*vec4(att,att,att,att);
    diffuselight = clamp(diffuselight, 0.0, 1.0)*2.0;
    vec4 amb = vec4(.2,.2,.2,0);

    vec4 texture = texture2D(albedoMap,texcoord);

    gl_FragColor =  ((diffuselight)+amb)*texture;

}

This has a lot of functions that are referenced elsewhere, but I think you can get the general basis from the pictures and the code. This is the main rendering function:

glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

//render skybox
glLoadIdentity();
renderSkybox();
//skybox.renderObject();
glLoadIdentity();
renderViewModel();


renderCamera();
glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
GLfloat position[] = {-Lighting.x,-Lighting.y,-Lighting.z,1};
glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_POSITION, position);
glDisable(GL_LIGHTING);

glm::mat4 modelView,projection,final;
glGetFloatv(GL_MODELVIEW_MATRIX, &modelView[0][0]);
glGetFloatv(GL_PROJECTION_MATRIX, &projection[0][0]);
final=modelView*projection;

Lighting.setupDepthImage();
glLoadIdentity();

for (int i = 0; i < objects.size(); i++)
{
   objects[i].renderObjectForDepth();
}
    Lighting.finishDepthImage();

//render the 3 buffers

//normal buffer
glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, Lighting.Normal.frameBuffer);
glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);
for (int i = 0; i < objects.size(); i++)
{
  objects[i].renderObjectWithProgram(Lighting.normalShader);
}
//albedo
glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, Lighting.Albedo.frameBuffer);
glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);
for (int i = 0; i < objects.size(); i++)
{
    objects[i].renderObjectWithProgram(0);
}
//position
glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, Lighting.Position.frameBuffer);
glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);
for (int i = 0; i < objects.size(); i++)
{
    objects[i].renderObjectWithProgram(Lighting.positionShader);
}
//go back to rendering directly to the screen
 glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, 0);


renderCamera();
glTranslatef(-test.position.x, test.position.y, -test.position.z);
test.updateParticle(1);

//render the buffers for debugging
renderViewModel();
glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
glLoadIdentity();
glOrtho(0, 1280, 800, 0, -1, 1);
glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
glLoadIdentity();

//render the full screen quad for the sun
glUseProgram(Lighting.sunShader);

glUniform1i(glGetUniformLocation(Lighting.sunShader,"normalMap"),0);
glUniform1i(glGetUniformLocation(Lighting.sunShader,"albedoMap"),1);
glUniform1i(glGetUniformLocation(Lighting.sunShader,"positionMap"),2);
glUniformMatrix4fv(glGetUniformLocation(Lighting.sunShader, "matrix"), 1, GL_FALSE, &final[0][0]);

glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, Lighting.Normal.texture);
glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE1);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, Lighting.Albedo.texture);
glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE2);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, Lighting.Position.texture);




glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, Lighting.debugFinal.frameBuffer);
 glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);
glBegin(GL_QUADS);
glTexCoord2f(0, 1);
glVertex2f(0, 0);
glTexCoord2f(1, 1);
glVertex2f(1280, 0);
glTexCoord2f(1, 0);
glVertex2f(1280, 800);
glTexCoord2f(0, 0);
glVertex2f(0, 800);
glEnd();

glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, 0);
glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0);

glUseProgram(0);
//normals
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,Lighting.Normal.texture);
glBegin(GL_QUADS);
glTexCoord2f(0, 1);
glVertex2f(0, 0);
glTexCoord2f(1, 1);
glVertex2f(640, 0);
glTexCoord2f(1, 0);
glVertex2f(640, 400);
glTexCoord2f(0, 0);
glVertex2f(0, 400);
glEnd();
//albedo
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,Lighting.Albedo.texture);
glBegin(GL_QUADS);
glTexCoord2f(0, 1);
glVertex2f(640, 0);
glTexCoord2f(1, 1);
glVertex2f(1280, 0);
glTexCoord2f(1, 0);
glVertex2f(1280, 400);
glTexCoord2f(0, 0);
glVertex2f(640, 400);
glEnd();
//position
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,Lighting.Position.texture);
glBegin(GL_QUADS);
glTexCoord2f(0, 1);
glVertex2f(0, 400);
glTexCoord2f(1, 1);
glVertex2f(640, 400);
glTexCoord2f(1, 0);
glVertex2f(640, 800);
glTexCoord2f(0, 0);
glVertex2f(0, 800);
glEnd();
//final image
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,Lighting.debugFinal.texture);
glBegin(GL_QUADS);
glTexCoord2f(0, 1);
glVertex2f(640, 400);
glTexCoord2f(1, 1);
glVertex2f(1280, 400);
glTexCoord2f(1, 0);
glVertex2f(1280, 800);
glTexCoord2f(0, 0);
glVertex2f(640, 800);
glEnd();
View3D();



SDL_GL_SwapWindow(window);
glLoadIdentity();

There are a few unrelated things in here, just ignore them. As you saw, I get the light's position using GLSL's default method. I think that because I am in an orthographic view, something is screwing with the light's position. Could this be the problem, or is there something else, perhaps in the calculation of the normals,etc?

share|improve this question
    
Where are your #version directives? –  genpfault Oct 9 '13 at 21:15
    
@genpfault I've never had any trouble with not having them... –  BlueSpud Oct 9 '13 at 21:18
2  
Look into reconstructing world-space / view-space position from the depth buffer. Storing the position in its own buffer with adequate precision (e.g. 32-bit FP per-component) will eat memory bandwidth like there is no tomorrow. For that matter, define which coordinate space your G-Buffers are stored in clearly somewhere, this may be your entire problem; I prefer world-space buffers for performance in the various post-processing effects I use and most of the big name engines (e.g. Unreal Engine 4, CryTek 3, etc. do the same). –  Andon M. Coleman Oct 9 '13 at 21:32
    
@AndonM.Coleman right now I'm not concerned with RAM problems. If the precision still wasn't very hight wouldn't it still have a similar result as the straight rendering? –  BlueSpud Oct 9 '13 at 21:35
1  
let us continue this discussion in chat –  Andon M. Coleman Oct 9 '13 at 22:27
show 8 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

People will probably not find this useful but I have solved my problem. I was using the regular opengl lights for lighting in the shader. When I set the position I made the w value 1, which would make it a directional light, not a point light, and therefore gave the light moving behavior.

As a side not I changed the position to reconstruct from the depth buffer as well as a few other things to improve the G-buffer.

share|improve this answer
1  
Ah, yes. I am surprised I did not think about this. You need to be aware that position vectors always have a 4th component (usually 1.0), so that 4x4 matrix multiplication works properly for operations like translation. Direction vectors can be 3D with the understanding that when multiplied by a 4x4 matrix, w is implicitly 0.0. Which explains perfectly why point lights (positional) have w=1.0, whereas directional lights have w=0.0. Be aware that when you specify a vertex pos. in a VBO using only 3 coordinates, when you use it in a vertex shader as a vec4 1.0 is automatically assigned to w. –  Andon M. Coleman Oct 16 '13 at 22:25
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.