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I have a very simple example of a cuda kernel that adds the corresponding rows of two matrices. I have a question about the memory access of the matrices. I call the kernel via a mexfunction. We know that in matlab we have a column-major order access and in C/C++ a row-major order. Based in cuda memory organization we have coordinates , (x,y), inside the grid for each block and thread. I have tried to access the matrices in the kernel examples with both ways row/column-major order [1]. In the first kernel, correct me if I am wrong, there is an column-major access while in the second one a row-major access. Both kernels are initialized with the same parameters, number of blocks and number of frames. I believed that the second kernel that uses a row-major order access of the matrices would be the correct way to access the matrix as we were in c++. Unfortunately, kernel with the column-major order returns the correct results according to the algorithm. Does anybody has a good explanation? Does this observations has anything to do with the fact that we call the kernel via a mexfunction which means matlab and as a consequence a column-major order access?

Both kernels called as:

int numElements =  rows * cols; // rows and cols of d_A or d_B
int threadsPerBlock = 16;
int blocksPerGrid = ceil( (double) (numElements) / threadsPerBlock);
dim3 dimBlock( threadsPerBlock,threadsPerBlock ); 
dim3 dimGrid( blocksPerGrid, blocksPerGrid ); 
cudaEuclid<<<dimGrid, dimBlock>>>( d_A, d_B, d_C, rows, cols );

Kernel 1: (Working but not row-major c++ style)

 __global__ void cudaEuclid( float* A, float* B, float* C, int rows, int cols )
{
        int i, squareeucldist = 0;
        int r = blockDim.x * blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x; // rows
        int c = blockDim.y * blockIdx.y + threadIdx.y; // cols 


        if( r < rows  ){
            for ( i = 0; i < cols; i++ )
                            //column-major order
                squareeucldist  += ( A[r + rows*i] - B[r + rows*i] ) * ( A[r + rows*i] - B[r + rows*i] );
            C[r] = squareeucldist;
            squareeucldist = 0;
        }
}   

kernel 2:(row-major order, c++ style)

__global__ void cudaEuclid( float* A, float* B, float* C, int rows, int cols )
    {
        int i, squareeucldist = 0;
        int c = blockDim.x * blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x; // cols
        int r = blockDim.y * blockIdx.y + threadIdx.y; // rows


        if( r < rows  ){
            for ( i = 0; i < cols; i++ )
                            //row-major order
                squareeucldist  += ( A[i + cols*r] - B[i + cols*r] ) * ( A[i + cols*r] - B[i + cols*r] );
            C[r] = squareeucldist;
            squareeucldist = 0;
    }
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Does this observations has anything to do with the fact that we call the kernel via a mexfunction which means matlab and as a consequence a column-major order access?

Yes.

Expanding on that, I mean to say that you have demonstrated that there is no reason why a column-major convention cannot be used in C/C++ with simple 1D buffers (the use of CUDA is irrelevant in your case).

Think of a MATLAB array as a special class that happens to keep the data buffer in column-major order. It's actually called mxArray under the hood, and you can get a peak at the details with just MATLAB using format debug.

>> format debug
>> x = [1 2 3; 4 5 6]
x =

Structure address = a91d8a0 
m = 2
n = 3
pr = 7406f620 
pi = 0
     1     2     3
     4     5     6

There is a single buffer at the address in pr and the mxArray knows that it has m=2 rows and n=3 columns. Because it is MATLAB, x(2) is 4 rather than 2 as is convention in C for the second value. In C, if you define this 2D array as int A[2][3] = { {1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6} };, the values will be laid out as 1 2 3 4 5 6.

However, if you have a simple 1D buffer that you access by computing the linear index from the row and column, then there is nothing preventing you from changing the convention. In your C examples, you are just working with buffers (e.g. float* A) so it is up to you how to index it (A[r + rows*c] vs. A[c + cols*r]).

Long story short, either transpose in MATLAB and use row-major kernel, or leave the MATLAB input alone and use column-major kernel.

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You mean that If we call the kernel via a c++ main function instead of a mexfunction then the kernel 2 should return the expected results? – Darkmoor Oct 9 '13 at 22:43
    
It depends how you decide to organize the data in your C++ function. There is nothing stopping you from adopting a column-major layout in C++ -- it is just not the conventional way of storing a matrix. – chappjc Oct 9 '13 at 23:10

As you have mentioned, Matlab uses a column-major ordering, so a certain matrix, say A, will be stored accordingly in the CPU memory.

At a certain point in your program, you will need to move A from host memory to device memory by cudaMemcpy. Therefore, A will be stored in device memory in column-major order and must be read taking that into account.

Obviously, you can fictitiously achieve row-major ordering storage in Matlab by transposing the matrix. This could have some advantages to achieve coalesced memory accesses.

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