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I'm using ruby-head and Debian wheezy x64. When I run a multithreaded ruby script, htop shows that it's using multiple cores visually with the bars at the top, and that it's using 100% CPU on the process list but it's only using 100% of the capacity of one core. I assume it's possible to have multiple cores running at 100% and this number seems too convenient to be bottle-necked by either the program logic or another hardware aspect. Is the OS limiting the amount of available instructions I'm using, if so how do I stop this?

EDIT more info:

When I mean visually using multiple cores e.g.: 47% core 1, 29% core 2, and 24% core 3. These percentages are constantly shifting up and down and to different sets of cores, but always collectively add up to 100%-102%. More than 3(/8 total) cores are being used, but any cores other than the three most burdened only utilize 2% or less capacity. I guess I should also mention this is a linode VPS.

EDIT:

Well it looks like I was reading promises that 2.0 would feature true parallel threads, and not actual release information. Time to switch to Jruby...

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possible duplicate of Does ruby have real multithreading? –  rudolph9 Oct 9 '13 at 21:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

MRI implements Ruby Threads as Green Threads within its interpreter. Unfortunately, it doesn't allow those threads to be scheduled in parallel, they can only run one thread at a time.

See similar question here

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I thought ruby 2.0 fixed that. Also I'm not sure your answer makes sense because I'm clearly seeing the OS displaying multiple cores being utilized. –  gtech Oct 9 '13 at 21:54
    
Nope, the global interpreter lock in ruby is a lot of work to make compatible with true multi-threading. –  rudolph9 Oct 9 '13 at 21:59
    
Ah, I'm sorry. Looks like I was only reading promises of the feature. Time to switch to Jruby. –  gtech Oct 9 '13 at 22:01

You failed to mention which Ruby implementation you are using. Not all Ruby implementations are capable of scheduling Ruby threads to multiple CPUs.

In particular:

  • MRI implements Ruby threads as green threads inside the interpreter and schedules them itself; it cannot schedule more than one thread at a time and it cannot schedule them to multiple CPUs
  • YARV implements Ruby threads as native OS threads (POSIX threads or Windows threads) and lets the OS schedule them, however it puts a Giant VM Lock (GVL) around them, so that only one Ruby thread can be running at any given time
  • Rubinius implements Ruby threads as native OS threads (POSIX threads or Windows threads) and lets the OS schedule them, however it puts a Global Interpreter Lock (GIL) around them, so that only one Ruby thread can be running at any given time; Rubinius 2.0 is going to have fine-grained locks so that multiple Ruby threads can run at any given time
  • JRuby implements Ruby threads as JVM threads and uses fine-grained locking so that multiple threads can be running; however, whether or not those threads are scheduled to multiple CPUs depends on the JVM being used, some allow this, some don't
  • IronRuby implements Ruby threads as CLI threads and uses fine-grained locking so that multiple threads can be running; however, whether or not those threads are scheduled to multiple CPUs depends on the VES being used, some allow this, some don't
  • MacRuby implements Ruby threads as native OS threads and uses fine-grained locking so that multiple threads can be running on multiple CPUs at the same time

I don't know enough about Topaz, Cardinal, MagLev, MRuby and all the others.

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