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Does anybody knows the different between Key and _key in the List<> and Dictionary, how to approach them and manipulate them?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Chris Lively, Gayot Fow, Mohsen Nosratinia, ctacke, iCodez Oct 10 '13 at 0:14

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Your question is unclear. –  Tilak Oct 9 '13 at 21:56
    
Where do you see _key ?? –  Habib Oct 9 '13 at 21:58
    
for example: imgur.com/OIiYQ0f –  Jaap Terlouw Oct 9 '13 at 22:13
    
or this with normal keys: imgur.com/9shrhu6 –  Jaap Terlouw Oct 9 '13 at 22:14
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They are backing-fields for the public exposed properties and why would you want to manipulate them? –  Silvermind Oct 9 '13 at 22:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From your question and examples, I'm guessing you are enumerating a collection of DictionaryEntry structures. If that is the case, _key is a private member variable and Key is a public property. You can access Key from your code because it is public, but not _key because it is private.

The debugger is able to show you both values via reflection. You should only use the Key property in your code.

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ok that explains the difference, but not why I can't set the Public Key with my dynamic Class and it just shows up into the private _key, also explains why the jQuery autocomplete does not function without it ))) –  Jaap Terlouw Oct 9 '13 at 22:27
    
Can you add the representative code for your dynamic class to your question? Seeing some code may help see what's happening. –  kevo Oct 10 '13 at 13:04

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