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The following definition results in a memory leak:

def enumIterator1[E, F[_]: Monad](x: => Iterator[E]) : EnumeratorT[E, F] =
  new EnumeratorT[E, F] {
    def apply[A] = (s: StepT[E, F, A]) => {
      def go(xs: Iterator[E]): IterateeT[E, F, A] =
        if(xs.isEmpty) s.pointI
        else {
          val next = xs.next
          s mapCont { k => 
            k(Iteratee.elInput(next)) >>== enumIterator1[E, F](xs).apply[A] 
          }
        }
      go(x)
    }
  }

The leak can be observed with the following test:

(Iteratee.fold[Array[Byte], IO, Long](0L)(_+_.length) 
  &= enumIterator1(
    Iterator.continually(
      Array.fill(1 << 16)(0.toByte)).take(1 << 16))
).run.unsafePerformIO

However, a minor change (i.e., moving the xs.next call) stops the leak:

def enumIterator1[E, F[_]: Monad](x: => Iterator[E]) : EnumeratorT[E, F] =
  new EnumeratorT[E, F] {
    def apply[A] = (s: StepT[E, F, A]) => {
      def go(xs: Iterator[E]): IterateeT[E, F, A] =
        if(xs.isEmpty) s.pointI
        else {
          // val next = xs.next (moved down)
          s mapCont { k => 
            val next = xs.next
            k(Iteratee.elInput(next)) >>== enumIterator1[E, F](xs).apply[A] 
          }
        }
      go(x)
    }
  }

Why?

I have a vague notion that the explanation has to do with the reference pattern of the closures, but I can't come up with a specific reason for this behavior. I'm trying to track down a different memory leak, and I suspect (hope?) that understanding this leak may help to identify the cause of that one.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+500

The problem is that the anonymous function passed to mapCont closes over next. In turn, this is closed-over by the lazy variable we pass to enumIterator, which is closed-over by the new Enumerator formed by enumIterator1, which is closed-over by the anonymous function in apply, which is finally closed-over by the anonymous function passed to mapCont for the next iteration.

So, by a chain of closures, each enumerator closes over its predecessor. This would probably happen whether next was captured or not, so you'd have a minor memory leak either way. However, you end up capturing next in one of these closures, which means that every value generated by your iterator stays in memory until the whole process is complete (and these values take up a lot of memory).

By moving next inside the anonymous function passed to mapCont, next is not captured in our chain of closures any more, so the main memory leak disappears (although your closures still close over each other, which may be a concern).

The best way to fix this is probably to simplify it. As Brian Kernighan famously said:

Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you're as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it?

I'm not certain I fully understand the code, but I suspect the following is equivalent:

def enumIterator1[E, F[_]: Monad](x: => Iterator[E]) : EnumeratorT[E, F] =
  new EnumeratorT[E, F] {
    def apply[A] = {
      val xs = x
      def innerApply(s: StepT[E, F, A]): IterateeT[E, F, A] = {
        if(xs.isEmpty) s.pointI
        else {
          val next = xs.next
          s mapCont { cont => // renamed k to cont, as the function, rather than the variable, is k
            cont(Iteratee.elInput(next)) >>== innerApply
          }
        }
      }
      innerApply
    }
  }

You might also benefit from making things more explicit. For example, what if rather than having an anonymous EnumeratorT that implicitly closes over anything it needs within its scope, you define a named class, with top level scope, and pass in anything it needs explicitly.

I used -XX:+HeapDumpOnOutOfMemoryError, VisualVM, and javap to find the cause of the issue. They should be everything you need.

Update

I think I'm starting to grok what the code's supposed to do, and I've updated my code accordingly. I think the problem was the use of enumIterator1[E, F](xs).apply[A]. The code was creating a new EnumeratorT just to get at its apply method, but creating a by-name variable and closing over everything-and-its-dog in the process. Since the value of xs doesn't change from one recursion to the next, we create an innerApply method which closes over the val xs, and re-use innerApply.

Update 2

I was curious, so I had a look around in the Scalaz source to see how they solve this problem. Here's some code with a similar bent from Scalaz itself:

def enumIterator[E, F[_]](x: => Iterator[E])(implicit MO: MonadPartialOrder[F, IO]) : EnumeratorT[E, F] =
  new EnumeratorT[E, F] {
    import MO._ // Remove this line, and you can copy and paste it into your code
    def apply[A] = {
      def go(xs: Iterator[E])(s: StepT[E, F, A]): IterateeT[E, F, A] =
        if(xs.isEmpty) s.pointI
        else {
          s mapCont { k => 
            val next = xs.next
            k(elInput(next)) >>== go(xs)
          }
        }
      go(x)
    }
  }

They use currying, rather than closure, to capture xs, but it's still an "inner apply" approach.

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I'm trying to follow that chain of closures, and I can't wrap my head around the second step. Why does the anonymous function argument of mapCont get closed over by the by-name argument to enumIterator1? (I assume you meant enumIterator1 rather than enumIterator) –  Aaron Novstrup Jun 19 at 18:24
    
I might have made a mistake, but IIRC it's because it finds xs via outer$. –  James_pic Jun 19 at 18:26
    
That makes some sense, I suppose, but it seems like it must be a compiler bug then. Closures shouldn't hold references that they never use. Thanks for tracking this down. I plan to verify your explanation within the next couple days, then award the tick and bounty. –  Aaron Novstrup Jun 19 at 18:35
    
The suggested implementation is not equivalent, by the way. It's essential for the Iterator to be a by-name argument in order to use enumIterator1 in functional code. Unlike Iterators, Enumerators are reusable, so correct usage of enumIterator1 involves passing a function that constructs an Iterator rather than passing the Iterator itself. –  Aaron Novstrup Jun 19 at 18:41
    
I suspected my code was different in some subtle way - my experience with iteratees is from Play, which has some subtle differences. You should probably check my working on the chain of closures as well - my approach was basically to follow the references in the heap dump, and try to figure out what the corresponding classes do by looking at them in javap. But either way, simplifying should make things clearer. –  James_pic Jun 19 at 18:58

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